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On Publications

59 total works; 34 research publications (5 book chapters, 17 journal articles, 12 peer-reviewed conference papers), 15 peer-reviewed abstracts, and 11 other publications. 1232 citations of published works since 1999 for 72 citations/year. Overall impact metrics: h-index of 18, g-index of 34 as of October 2016.

Selected publications

A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and Michael Gertz
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 13(2):357–369, 2007. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2007.28

Abstract

Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations—the depiction—and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.

Keywords: visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2007:AMa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Gertz, Michael}, title = {A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations---the depiction---and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.}, keywords = {visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization}, volume = {13}, number = {2}, pages = {357--369}, year = {2007}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2007.28}, }

Visualization Exploration And Encapsulation Via A Spreadsheet-Like Interface

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 7(3):275–287, 2001. doi: 10.1109/2945.942695

Abstract

Exploring complex, very large data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. Two types of audience benefit from such coherent organization and representation: first, the user of the visualization system can examine and evaluate their data more efficiently; second, collaborators or reviewers can quickly understand and extend the visualization. The needs of these two groups are addressed by the spreadsheet-like interface described in this paper. The interface represents a 2D window in a multidimensional visualization parameter space. Data is explored by navigating this space via the interface. The visualization space is presented to the user in a manner that clearly identifies which parameters correspond to which visualized result. Operations defined on this space can be applied which generate new parameters or results. Combined with a general-purpose interpreter, these functions can be utilized to quickly extract desired results. Finally, by encapsulating the visualization process, redundant exploration is eliminated and collaboration is facilitated. The efficacy of this novel interface is demonstrated through examples using a variety of data sets in different domains.

Keywords: spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, collaboration, information visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2001:VEa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {Visualization Exploration And Encapsulation Via A Spreadsheet-Like Interface}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Exploring complex, very large data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. Two types of audience benefit from such coherent organization and representation: first, the user of the visualization system can examine and evaluate their data more efficiently; second, collaborators or reviewers can quickly understand and extend the visualization. The needs of these two groups are addressed by the spreadsheet-like interface described in this paper. The interface represents a 2D window in a multidimensional visualization parameter space. Data is explored by navigating this space via the interface. The visualization space is presented to the user in a manner that clearly identifies which parameters correspond to which visualized result. Operations defined on this space can be applied which generate new parameters or results. Combined with a general-purpose interpreter, these functions can be utilized to quickly extract desired results. Finally, by encapsulating the visualization process, redundant exploration is eliminated and collaboration is facilitated. The efficacy of this novel interface is demonstrated through examples using a variety of data sets in different domains. }, keywords = {spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, collaboration, information visualization}, volume = {7}, number = {3}, pages = {275--287}, year = {2001}, doi = {10.1109/2945.942695}, }

Fluid Interaction for Information Visualization

Niklaus Elmqvist, Andrew Vande Moere, Hans-Christian Jetter, Daniel Cernea, Harald Reiterer, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
Information Visualization, 10(4):327–340, 2011. doi: 10.1177/1473871611413180

Abstract

Despite typically receiving little emphasis in visualization research, interaction in visualization is the catalyst for the user’s dialogue with the data, and, ultimately, the user’s actual understanding and insight into this data. There are many possible reasons for this skewed balance between the visual and interactive aspects of a visualization. One reason is that interaction is an intangible concept that is difficult to design, quantify, and evaluate. Unlike for visual design, there are few examples that show visualization practitioners and researchers how to best design the interaction for a new visualization. In this paper, we attempt to address this issue by collecting examples of visualizations with “best-in-class” interaction and using them to extract practical design guidelines for future designers and researchers. We call this concept fluid interaction, and we propose a operational definition in terms of the direct manipulation and embodied interaction paradigms, the psychological concept of “flow”, and Norman’s gulfs of execution and evaluation.

Keywords: fluidity, flow, embodiment, design, information visualization, human-computer interaction

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Elmqvist:2011:FIf, author = {Elmqvist, Niklaus and Vande Moere, Andrew and Jetter, Hans-Christian and Cernea, Daniel and Reiterer, Harald and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Fluid Interaction for Information Visualization}, journal = {Information Visualization}, abstract = {Despite typically receiving little emphasis in visualization research, interaction in visualization is the catalyst for the user's dialogue with the data, and, ultimately, the user's actual understanding and insight into this data. There are many possible reasons for this skewed balance between the visual and interactive aspects of a visualization. One reason is that interaction is an intangible concept that is difficult to design, quantify, and evaluate. Unlike for visual design, there are few examples that show visualization practitioners and researchers how to best design the interaction for a new visualization. In this paper, we attempt to address this issue by collecting examples of visualizations with ``best-in-class'' interaction and using them to extract practical design guidelines for future designers and researchers. We call this concept fluid interaction, and we propose a operational definition in terms of the direct manipulation and embodied interaction paradigms, the psychological concept of ``flow'', and Norman's gulfs of execution and evaluation.}, keywords = {fluidity, flow, embodiment, design, information visualization, human-computer interaction}, volume = {10}, number = {4}, pages = {327--340}, year = {2011}, doi = {10.1177/1473871611413180}, }

Visual Data Analysis for Detecting Flaws and Intruders in Computer Network Systems

Soon Tee Teoh, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and S. Felix Wu
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 24(5):27–35, 2004. doi: 10.1109/MCG.2004.26

Abstract

To ensure the normal operation of a large computer network system, the common practice is to constantly collect system logs and analyze the network activities for detecting anomalies. Most of the analysis methods in use today are highly automated due to the enormous size of the collected data. Conventional automated methods are largely based on statistical modeling, and some employ machine learning. In this paper, we show interactive visualization as an alternative and effective data exploration method for understanding the complex behaviors of computer network systems. We describe three log-file analysis applications, and demonstrate how the use of our visualization-centered tools can lead to the discovery of flaws and intruders in the network systems.

Keywords: information visualization, intrusion detection, visual data mining, network visualization, internet routing stability

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Teoh:2004:VDA, author = {Teoh, Soon Tee and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Wu, S. Felix}, title = {Visual Data Analysis for Detecting Flaws and Intruders in Computer Network Systems}, journal = {IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications}, abstract = {To ensure the normal operation of a large computer network system, the common practice is to constantly collect system logs and analyze the network activities for detecting anomalies. Most of the analysis methods in use today are highly automated due to the enormous size of the collected data. Conventional automated methods are largely based on statistical modeling, and some employ machine learning. In this paper, we show interactive visualization as an alternative and effective data exploration method for understanding the complex behaviors of computer network systems. We describe three log-file analysis applications, and demonstrate how the use of our visualization-centered tools can lead to the discovery of flaws and intruders in the network systems.}, keywords = {information visualization, intrusion detection, visual data mining, network visualization, internet routing stability}, volume = {24}, number = {5}, pages = {27--35}, year = {2004}, doi = {10.1109/MCG.2004.26}, }

Visual Analysis for Textual Relationships in Digital Forensic Evidence

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, David Wilson, Andrew S. Stamps, Josh Franck, Jeffrey Carver, and J. Edward Swan
Information Visualization, 10(2):134–144, 2011. doi: 10.1057/ivs.2010.15

Abstract

We present a visual analytics framework for exploring the textual relationships in computer forensics. Based on a task analysis study performed with practitioners, our tool addresses the inefficiency of searching for related text documents on a hard drive. Our framework searches both allocated and unallocated sectors for text and performs some pre-analysis processing; this information is then presented via a visualization that displays both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on the disk. We also present a case study that demonstrates our framework’s operation, and we report on an informal evaluation conducted with forensics analysts from the Mississippi State Attorney General’s Office and National Forensics Training Center.

Keywords: computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2011:VAf, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Wilson, David and Stamps, Andrew S. and Franck, Josh and Carver, Jeffrey and Swan, J. Edward}, title = {Visual Analysis for Textual Relationships in Digital Forensic Evidence}, journal = {Information Visualization}, abstract = {We present a visual analytics framework for exploring the textual relationships in computer forensics. Based on a task analysis study performed with practitioners, our tool addresses the inefficiency of searching for related text documents on a hard drive. Our framework searches both allocated and unallocated sectors for text and performs some pre-analysis processing; this information is then presented via a visualization that displays both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on the disk. We also present a case study that demonstrates our framework's operation, and we report on an informal evaluation conducted with forensics analysts from the Mississippi State Attorney General's Office and National Forensics Training Center.}, keywords = {computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds}, volume = {10}, number = {2}, pages = {134--144}, year = {2011}, doi = {10.1057/ivs.2010.15}, }

MoireGraphs: Radial Focus+Context Visualization and Interaction for Graphs with Visual Nodes

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
In Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization, pp. 59–66, 2003 (23/90 [26%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/INFVIS.2003.1249009

Abstract

Graph and tree visualization techniques enable interactive exploration of complex relations while communicating topology. However, most existing techniques have not been designed for situations where visual information such as images is also present at each node and must be displayed. This paper presents MoireGraphs to address this need. MoireGraphs combine a new focus+context radial graph layout with a suite of interaction techniques (focus strength changing, radial rotation, level highlighting, secondary foci, animated transitions and node information) to assist in the exploration of graphs with visual nodes. The method is scalable to hundreds of displayed visual nodes.

Keywords: information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, graph drawing

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2003:MRF, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {MoireGraphs: Radial Focus+Context Visualization and Interaction for Graphs with Visual Nodes}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization}, editor = {Munzner, Tamara and North, Stephen}, abstract = {Graph and tree visualization techniques enable interactive exploration of complex relations while communicating topology. However, most existing techniques have not been designed for situations where visual information such as images is also present at each node and must be displayed. This paper presents MoireGraphs to address this need. MoireGraphs combine a new focus+context radial graph layout with a suite of interaction techniques (focus strength changing, radial rotation, level highlighting, secondary foci, animated transitions and node information) to assist in the exploration of graphs with visual nodes. The method is scalable to hundreds of displayed visual nodes. }, keywords = {information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, graph drawing}, pages = {59--66}, year = {2003}, acceptance = {23/90 [26%]}, doi = {10.1109/INFVIS.2003.1249009}, }

Superellipsoid-based, Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Glyphs Motivated by Nematic Liquid Crystal Alignment Visualization

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Ketan Mehta
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 12(5):, 2006. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2006.133

Abstract

A glyph-based method for visualizing the nematic liquid crystal alignment tensor is introduced. Unlike previous approaches, the glyph is based upon physically-linked metrics, not offsets of the eigenvalues. These metrics, combined with a set of superellipsoid shapes, communicate both the strength of the crystal’s uniaxial alignment and the amount of biaxiality. With small modifications, our approach can visualize any real symmetric traceless tensor.

Keywords: scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2006:SbR, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Mehta, Ketan}, title = {Superellipsoid-based, Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Glyphs Motivated by Nematic Liquid Crystal Alignment Visualization}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {A glyph-based method for visualizing the nematic liquid crystal alignment tensor is introduced. Unlike previous approaches, the glyph is based upon physically-linked metrics, not offsets of the eigenvalues. These metrics, combined with a set of superellipsoid shapes, communicate both the strength of the crystal's uniaxial alignment and the amount of biaxiality. With small modifications, our approach can visualize any real symmetric traceless tensor.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals}, volume = {12}, number = {5}, pages = {}, year = {2006}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2006.133}, }

An Evaluation of Glyph Perception for Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Properties

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Yagneshwara S. Lanka, and J. Edward Swan II
Computer Graphics Forum, 29(3):1133–1142, 2010. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8659.2009.01711.x

Abstract

A perceptual study of four tensor glyphs for symmetric, real, traceless tensors was performed. Each glyph encodes three properties of the system: Orientation, uniaxiality (alignment along the direction of orientation), and biaxiality (alignment along a vector orthogonal to the orientation). Thirty users over two studies were asked to identify these three properties for each glyph type under a variety of permutations in order to evaluate the effectiveness of visually communicating the properties; response time was also measured. We discuss the significant differences found between the methods as guidance to the use of these glyphs for traceless tensor visualization.

Keywords: tensor visualization, evaluation, user study, glyphs

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2010:AEo, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Lanka, Yagneshwara S. and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {An Evaluation of Glyph Perception for Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Properties}, journal = {Computer Graphics Forum}, abstract = {A perceptual study of four tensor glyphs for symmetric, real, traceless tensors was performed. Each glyph encodes three properties of the system: Orientation, uniaxiality (alignment along the direction of orientation), and biaxiality (alignment along a vector orthogonal to the orientation). Thirty users over two studies were asked to identify these three properties for each glyph type under a variety of permutations in order to evaluate the effectiveness of visually communicating the properties; response time was also measured. We discuss the significant differences found between the methods as guidance to the use of these glyphs for traceless tensor visualization.}, keywords = {tensor visualization, evaluation, user study, glyphs}, volume = {29}, number = {3}, pages = {1133--1142}, year = {2010}, doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8659.2009.01711.x}, }

Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Andrew D. Lindeman, and Susan M. Bridges
BMC Bioinformatics, 10(Supplement 11):7, 2009. doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-10-S11-S7

Abstract

Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.

Keywords: information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2009:EVA, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Lindeman, Andrew D. and Bridges, Susan M.}, title = {Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments}, journal = {BMC Bioinformatics}, abstract = {Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.}, keywords = {information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains}, volume = {10}, number = {Supplement 11}, pages = {7}, year = {2009}, doi = {10.1186/1471-2105-10-S11-S7}, }

Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive Parallel Coordinates

Chad A. Steed, J. Edward Swan II, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, and Patrick J. Fitzpatrick
In Proceedings of the IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST 2009), pp. 19–26, 2009 (26/69 [38%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/VAST.2009.5332586

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive multivariate representations with information from statistical processes in the domain of weather data analysis. Statistical regression, correlation analysis, and descriptive statistical calculations are integrated via graphical indicators into an enhanced parallel coordinates system, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX). These statistical indicators, which highlight significant associations in the data, are complemented with interactive visual analysis capabilities. The resulting system allows a smooth, interactive, and highly visual workflow. The system’s utility is demonstrated with an extensive hurricane climate study that was conducted by a hurricane expert. In the study, the expert used a new data set of environmental weather data, composed of 28 independent variables, to predict annual hurricane activity. MDX shows the Atlantic Meridional Mode increases the explained variance of hurricane seasonal activity by 7-15% and removes less significant variables used in earlier studies. The findings and feedback from the expert (1) validate the utility of the data set for hurricane prediction, and (2) indicate that the integration of statistical processes with interactive parallel coordinates, as implemented in our system, addresses both deficiencies in traditional weather data analysis and exhibits some of the expected benefits of visual data analysis.

Keywords: climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2009:GAo, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Swan II, J. Edward and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.}, title = {Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive Parallel Coordinates}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST 2009)}, editor = {[u'']}, abstract = {This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive multivariate representations with information from statistical processes in the domain of weather data analysis. Statistical regression, correlation analysis, and descriptive statistical calculations are integrated via graphical indicators into an enhanced parallel coordinates system, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX). These statistical indicators, which highlight significant associations in the data, are complemented with interactive visual analysis capabilities. The resulting system allows a smooth, interactive, and highly visual workflow. The system's utility is demonstrated with an extensive hurricane climate study that was conducted by a hurricane expert. In the study, the expert used a new data set of environmental weather data, composed of 28 independent variables, to predict annual hurricane activity. MDX shows the Atlantic Meridional Mode increases the explained variance of hurricane seasonal activity by 7-15\% and removes less significant variables used in earlier studies. The findings and feedback from the expert (1) validate the utility of the data set for hurricane prediction, and (2) indicate that the integration of statistical processes with interactive parallel coordinates, as implemented in our system, addresses both deficiencies in traditional weather data analysis and exhibits some of the expected benefits of visual data analysis. }, keywords = {climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics}, pages = {19--26}, year = {2009}, acceptance = {26/69 [38%]}, doi = {10.1109/VAST.2009.5332586}, }

Toward Visualization for Games: Theory, Design Space, and Patterns

Brian Bowman, Niklaus Elmqvist, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 18(11):1956–1968, 2012. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2012.77

Abstract

Electronic games are starting to incorporate in-game telemetry that collects data about player, team, and community performance on a massive scale, and as data begins to accumulate, so does the demand for effectively analyzing this data. In this paper, we use examples from both old and new games of different genres to explore the theory and design space of visualization for games. Drawing on these examples, we define a design space for this novel research topic and use it to formulate design patterns for how to best apply visualization technology to games. We then discuss the implications that this new framework will potentially have on the design and development of game and visualization technology in the future.

Keywords: computer games, video games, interactive entertainment, entertainment, visualization, game analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Bowman:2012:TVf, author = {Bowman, Brian and Elmqvist, Niklaus and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Toward Visualization for Games: Theory, Design Space, and Patterns}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Electronic games are starting to incorporate in-game telemetry that collects data about player, team, and community performance on a massive scale, and as data begins to accumulate, so does the demand for effectively analyzing this data. In this paper, we use examples from both old and new games of different genres to explore the theory and design space of visualization for games. Drawing on these examples, we define a design space for this novel research topic and use it to formulate design patterns for how to best apply visualization technology to games. We then discuss the implications that this new framework will potentially have on the design and development of game and visualization technology in the future.}, keywords = {computer games, video games, interactive entertainment, entertainment, visualization, game analytics}, volume = {18}, number = {11}, pages = {1956--1968}, year = {2012}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2012.77}, }

Book Chapters

A Visual Analytics Approach for Correlation, Classification, and Regression Analysis

Chad A. Steed, J. Edward Swan II, Patrick J. Fitzpatrick, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Innovative Approaches of Data Visualization and Visual Analytics, Huang, M. L. and Huang, W. eds., pp. 25–45, IGI Global, 2014. doi: 10.4018/978-1-4666-4309-3.ch002

Abstract

New approaches that combine the strengths of humans and machines are necessary to equip analysts with the proper tools for exploring today’s increasingly complex, multivariate data sets. In this chapter, a visual data mining framework, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX), is described that addresses the challenges of today’s data by combining automated statistical analytics with a highly interactive parallel coordinates based canvas. In addition to several intuitive interaction capabilities, this framework offers a rich set of graphical statistical indicators, interactive regression analysis, visual correlation mining, automated axis arrangements and filtering, and data classification techniques. This chapter provides a detailed description of the system as well as a discussion of key design aspects and critical feedback from domain experts.

Keywords: visual analytics, hurricane, visualization analysis, regression

BibTeX Citation

@incollection{Steed:2014:AVA, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Swan II, J. Edward and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {A Visual Analytics Approach for Correlation, Classification, and Regression Analysis}, booktitle = {Innovative Approaches of Data Visualization and Visual Analytics}, editor = {Huang, M. L. and Huang, W.}, abstract = {New approaches that combine the strengths of humans and machines are necessary to equip analysts with the proper tools for exploring today's increasingly complex, multivariate data sets. In this chapter, a visual data mining framework, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX), is described that addresses the challenges of today's data by combining automated statistical analytics with a highly interactive parallel coordinates based canvas. In addition to several intuitive interaction capabilities, this framework offers a rich set of graphical statistical indicators, interactive regression analysis, visual correlation mining, automated axis arrangements and filtering, and data classification techniques. This chapter provides a detailed description of the system as well as a discussion of key design aspects and critical feedback from domain experts.}, keywords = {visual analytics, hurricane, visualization analysis, regression}, pages = {25--45}, publisher = {IGI Global}, year = {2014}, doi = {10.4018/978-1-4666-4309-3.ch002}, }

Scalability Considerations for Multivariate Graph Visualization

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Tim Dwyer, Danny Holten, Christophe Hurter, Martin Nöllenburg, Chris Weaver, and Kai Xu
In Multivariate Network Visualization, Kerren, Andreas and Purchase, Helen C. and Ward, Matthew O. eds., pp. 207–235, Springer, 2014. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-06793-3_10

Abstract

Real-world, multivariate datasets are frequently too large to show in their entirety on a visual display. Still, there are many techniques we can employ to show useful partial views-sufficient to support incremental exploration of large graph datasets. In this chapter, we first explore the cognitive and architectural limitations which restrict the amount of visual bandwidth available to multivariate graph visualization approaches. These limitations afford several design approaches, which we systematically explore. Finally, we survey systems and studies that exhibit these design strategies to mitigate these perceptual and architectural limitations.

Keywords: graph visualization, multivariate data, scalability, perception, gpu

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BibTeX Citation

@incollection{Jankun-Kelly:2014:SCf, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Dwyer, Tim and Holten, Danny and Hurter, Christophe and N{\"o}llenburg, Martin and Weaver, Chris and Xu, Kai}, title = {Scalability Considerations for Multivariate Graph Visualization}, booktitle = {Multivariate Network Visualization}, editor = {Kerren, Andreas and Purchase, Helen C. and Ward, Matthew O.}, abstract = {Real-world, multivariate datasets are frequently too large to show in their entirety on a visual display. Still, there are many techniques we can employ to show useful partial views-sufficient to support incremental exploration of large graph datasets. In this chapter, we first explore the cognitive and architectural limitations which restrict the amount of visual bandwidth available to multivariate graph visualization approaches. These limitations afford several design approaches, which we systematically explore. Finally, we survey systems and studies that exhibit these design strategies to mitigate these perceptual and architectural limitations.}, keywords = {graph visualization, multivariate data, scalability, perception, gpu}, pages = {207--235}, publisher = {Springer}, year = {2014}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-06793-3_10}, }

Tensor Visualization and Defect Detection for Nematic Liquid Crystals using Shape Characteristics

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Song Zhang, A. C. Callan-Jones, Robert A. Pelcovits, Vadim A. Slavin, and David H. Laidlaw
In Visualization and Processing of Tensor Fields, Laidlaw, David H. and Weickert, Joachim eds., pp. 213–238, Springer-Verlag, 2009. doi: 10.1007/978-3-540-88378-4_11

Abstract

Two alternate sets of tensor shape characteristics are introduced for the study of nematic liquid crystals, a little studied problem in tensor visualization. One set of characteristics are based on the physics of the liquid crystal system (a real, symmetric, traceless tensor); the other set is an application of the well known Westin DT-MRI shape characteristics. These shape metrics are used both for direct tensor visualization and for detection of defects within the liquid crystal matrix.

Keywords: scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals

BibTeX Citation

@incollection{Jankun-Kelly:2009:TVa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Zhang, Song and Callan-Jones, A. C. and Pelcovits, Robert A. and Slavin, Vadim A. and Laidlaw, David H.}, title = {Tensor Visualization and Defect Detection for Nematic Liquid Crystals using Shape Characteristics}, booktitle = {Visualization and Processing of Tensor Fields}, editor = {Laidlaw, David H. and Weickert, Joachim}, abstract = {Two alternate sets of tensor shape characteristics are introduced for the study of nematic liquid crystals, a little studied problem in tensor visualization. One set of characteristics are based on the physics of the liquid crystal system (a real, symmetric, traceless tensor); the other set is an application of the well known Westin DT-MRI shape characteristics. These shape metrics are used both for direct tensor visualization and for detection of defects within the liquid crystal matrix.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals}, pages = {213--238}, publisher = {Springer-Verlag}, year = {2009}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-88378-4_11}, }

Theoretical Foundations of Information Visualization

Helen C. Purchase, Natalia Andriendko, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, and Matthew O. Ward
In Information Visualization, Kerren, Andreas and Stasko, John T. and Fekete, Jean-Daniel and North, Chris eds., pp. 46–64, Springer-Verlag, 2008. doi: 10.1007/978-3-540-70956-5_3

Abstract

The field of Information Visualization, being related to many other diverse disciplines (for example, engineering, graphics, statistical modeling) suffers from not being based on a clear underlying theory. The absence of a framework for Information Visualization makes the significance of achievements in this area difficult to describe, validate and defend. Drawing on theories within associated disciplines, three different approaches to theoretical foundations of Information Visualization are presented here: data-centric predictive theory, information theory, and scientific modeling. Definitions from linguistic theory are used to provide an over-arching framework for these three approaches.

Keywords: information visualization, visualization theory, theory

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BibTeX Citation

@incollection{Purchase:2008:TFo, author = {Purchase, Helen C. and Andriendko, Natalia and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ward, Matthew O.}, title = {Theoretical Foundations of Information Visualization}, booktitle = {Information Visualization}, editor = {Kerren, Andreas and Stasko, John T. and Fekete, Jean-Daniel and North, Chris}, abstract = {The field of Information Visualization, being related to many other diverse disciplines (for example, engineering, graphics, statistical modeling) suffers from not being based on a clear underlying theory. The absence of a framework for Information Visualization makes the significance of achievements in this area difficult to describe, validate and defend. Drawing on theories within associated disciplines, three different approaches to theoretical foundations of Information Visualization are presented here: data-centric predictive theory, information theory, and scientific modeling. Definitions from linguistic theory are used to provide an over-arching framework for these three approaches.}, keywords = {information visualization, visualization theory, theory}, pages = {46--64}, publisher = {Springer-Verlag}, year = {2008}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-70956-5_3}, }

Interacting with Visualizations

F. Wim Fikkert, Marco D’Ambros, Torsten Bierz, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Human-Centered Visualization Environments, Kerren, Andreas and Ebert, Achim and Meyer, Jörg eds., pp. 71–161, Springer, 2007. doi: 10.1007/978-3-540-71949-6_3

Abstract

In human-media interactions, visualizations occur in a large variety of forms. However, they remain but a single form of possible feedback towards a user. In this chapter it is argued that human-centered visualization is a fundamental part of human-media interaction and vice versa. To that end, the focus in this chapter lies first on the more general topic of interaction research, thus providing a solid literary ground for the rest of this chapter (Section 3.1). In Section 3.2 the focus shifts towards the question how a display technology influences the way(s) in which interaction with visualization takes place. This path is then broadened in Section 3.3 by focusing on approaches towards interacting multimodally with visualizations. To that end a chronological overview of developments in that field is given, thus providing an insight of trends and required steps in realizing multimodal interactions. Also, future work in this field is deducted from literature and those development trends. Fourthly, Section 3.4 describes the issues at hand for effectively applying visualizations in group-based collaborative and distributed environments. The aim in this chapter is to provide an overview of developments and the current state-of-the-art of approaches in which visualization supports the human-machine interaction process and vice versa. For that, this chapter is finalized with a short summary of issues to deal with while designing interaction for visualization. In addition current and future challenges in interacting with visualizations will be discussed.

Keywords: interaction, visualization, large displays, multi-modal

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BibTeX Citation

@incollection{Fikkert:2007:IwV, author = {Fikkert, F. Wim and D'Ambros, Marco and Bierz, Torsten and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Interacting with Visualizations}, booktitle = {Human-Centered Visualization Environments}, editor = {Kerren, Andreas and Ebert, Achim and Meyer, J{\"o}rg}, abstract = {In human-media interactions, visualizations occur in a large variety of forms. However, they remain but a single form of possible feedback towards a user. In this chapter it is argued that human-centered visualization is a fundamental part of human-media interaction and vice versa. To that end, the focus in this chapter lies first on the more general topic of interaction research, thus providing a solid literary ground for the rest of this chapter (Section 3.1). In Section 3.2 the focus shifts towards the question how a display technology influences the way(s) in which interaction with visualization takes place. This path is then broadened in Section 3.3 by focusing on approaches towards interacting multimodally with visualizations. To that end a chronological overview of developments in that field is given, thus providing an insight of trends and required steps in realizing multimodal interactions. Also, future work in this field is deducted from literature and those development trends. Fourthly, Section 3.4 describes the issues at hand for effectively applying visualizations in group-based collaborative and distributed environments. The aim in this chapter is to provide an overview of developments and the current state-of-the-art of approaches in which visualization supports the human-machine interaction process and vice versa. For that, this chapter is finalized with a short summary of issues to deal with while designing interaction for visualization. In addition current and future challenges in interacting with visualizations will be discussed.}, keywords = {interaction, visualization, large displays, multi-modal}, pages = {71--161}, publisher = {Springer}, year = {2007}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-71949-6_3}, }

Refereed journal articles

Analytic Provenance for Sensemaking: A Research Agenda

Xu, Kai \and Attfield, Simon \and Jankun-Kelly T. J. \and Wheat Ashely \and Nguyen Phong H. \and Selvaraj Nallini
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 35(3):56–64, 2015. doi: 10.1109/MCG.2015.50

Abstract

Sensemaking is a process of finding meaning from information — a process of comprehension. A common theme is the idea of sensemaking as the con- struction, elaboration and reconciliation of representations which account for and explain the information we receive about the world. Things make sense when we have a representation or generalized belief which fits to our experi- ence, and things fail to make sense when this coherence is missing or there is simply no representation to speak of. Important to the sensemaking dynamic is the reciprocal relationship between the two, i.e. representations create expec- tations which guide us in information that we seek and also how we interpret information when we receive it, whilst information can challenge and shapes the representations we create.

Keywords: provenance, sensemaking, analytic provenance

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Xu:2015:APf, author = {Xu, Kai \and Attfield, Simon \and Jankun-Kelly T. J. \and Wheat Ashely \and Nguyen Phong H. \and Selvaraj Nallini}, title = {Analytic Provenance for Sensemaking: A Research Agenda}, journal = {IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications}, abstract = {Sensemaking is a process of finding meaning from information --- a process of comprehension. A common theme is the idea of sensemaking as the con- struction, elaboration and reconciliation of representations which account for and explain the information we receive about the world. Things make sense when we have a representation or generalized belief which fits to our experi- ence, and things fail to make sense when this coherence is missing or there is simply no representation to speak of. Important to the sensemaking dynamic is the reciprocal relationship between the two, i.e. representations create expec- tations which guide us in information that we seek and also how we interpret information when we receive it, whilst information can challenge and shapes the representations we create.}, keywords = {provenance, sensemaking, analytic provenance}, volume = {35}, number = {3}, pages = {56--64}, year = {2015}, doi = {10.1109/MCG.2015.50}, }

A 2D Flow Visualization User Study Using Explicit Flow Synthesis and Implicit Task Design

Zhanping Liu, Shangshu Cai, J. Edward Swan II, Robert J. Moorhead, Joel P. Martin, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 18(5):783–796, 2012. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2011.110

Abstract

his paper presents a 2D flow visualization user study that we conducted using new methodologies to increase the objectiveness. We evaluated grid-based variable-size arrows, evenly spaced streamlines, and LIC variants (basic, oriented, and enhanced versions) coupled with a colorwheel and/or rainbow color map, which are representative of geometry-based and texture-based techniques. To reduce data-related bias, template-based explicit flow synthesis was used to create a wide variety of symmetric flows with similar topological complexity. To suppress task-related bias, pattern-based implicit task design was employed, addressing critical point recognition, critical point classification, and symmetric pattern categorization. In addition, variable-duration and fixed-duration measurement schemes were utilized for lightweight precision-critical and heavyweight judgment-intensive flow analysis tasks, respectively, to record visualization effectiveness. We eliminated outliers and used the Ryan REGWQ post-hoc homogeneous subset tests in statistical analysis to obtain reliable findings. Our study shows that a texture-based dense representation with accentuated flow streaks, such as enhanced LIC, enables intuitive perception of the flow, while a geometry-based integral representation with uniform density control, such as evenly spaced streamlines, may exploit visual interpolation to facilitate mental reconstruction of the flow. It is also shown that inappropriate color mapping (e.g., colorwheel) may add distractions to a flow representation.

Keywords: flow visualization, user study, visualization effectiveness, flow synthesis, task design, test strategy, LIC, evenly spaced streamlines

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Liu:2012:A2D, author = {Liu, Zhanping and Cai, Shangshu and Swan II, J. Edward and Moorhead, Robert J. and Martin, Joel P. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {A 2D Flow Visualization User Study Using Explicit Flow Synthesis and Implicit Task Design}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {his paper presents a 2D flow visualization user study that we conducted using new methodologies to increase the objectiveness. We evaluated grid-based variable-size arrows, evenly spaced streamlines, and LIC variants (basic, oriented, and enhanced versions) coupled with a colorwheel and/or rainbow color map, which are representative of geometry-based and texture-based techniques. To reduce data-related bias, template-based explicit flow synthesis was used to create a wide variety of symmetric flows with similar topological complexity. To suppress task-related bias, pattern-based implicit task design was employed, addressing critical point recognition, critical point classification, and symmetric pattern categorization. In addition, variable-duration and fixed-duration measurement schemes were utilized for lightweight precision-critical and heavyweight judgment-intensive flow analysis tasks, respectively, to record visualization effectiveness. We eliminated outliers and used the Ryan REGWQ post-hoc homogeneous subset tests in statistical analysis to obtain reliable findings. Our study shows that a texture-based dense representation with accentuated flow streaks, such as enhanced LIC, enables intuitive perception of the flow, while a geometry-based integral representation with uniform density control, such as evenly spaced streamlines, may exploit visual interpolation to facilitate mental reconstruction of the flow. It is also shown that inappropriate color mapping (e.g., colorwheel) may add distractions to a flow representation.}, keywords = {flow visualization, user study, visualization effectiveness, flow synthesis, task design, test strategy, LIC, evenly spaced streamlines}, volume = {18}, number = {5}, pages = {783--796}, year = {2012}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2011.110}, }

Toward Visualization for Games: Theory, Design Space, and Patterns

Brian Bowman, Niklaus Elmqvist, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 18(11):1956–1968, 2012. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2012.77

Abstract

Electronic games are starting to incorporate in-game telemetry that collects data about player, team, and community performance on a massive scale, and as data begins to accumulate, so does the demand for effectively analyzing this data. In this paper, we use examples from both old and new games of different genres to explore the theory and design space of visualization for games. Drawing on these examples, we define a design space for this novel research topic and use it to formulate design patterns for how to best apply visualization technology to games. We then discuss the implications that this new framework will potentially have on the design and development of game and visualization technology in the future.

Keywords: computer games, video games, interactive entertainment, entertainment, visualization, game analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Bowman:2012:TVf, author = {Bowman, Brian and Elmqvist, Niklaus and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Toward Visualization for Games: Theory, Design Space, and Patterns}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Electronic games are starting to incorporate in-game telemetry that collects data about player, team, and community performance on a massive scale, and as data begins to accumulate, so does the demand for effectively analyzing this data. In this paper, we use examples from both old and new games of different genres to explore the theory and design space of visualization for games. Drawing on these examples, we define a design space for this novel research topic and use it to formulate design patterns for how to best apply visualization technology to games. We then discuss the implications that this new framework will potentially have on the design and development of game and visualization technology in the future.}, keywords = {computer games, video games, interactive entertainment, entertainment, visualization, game analytics}, volume = {18}, number = {11}, pages = {1956--1968}, year = {2012}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2012.77}, }

Fluid Interaction for Information Visualization

Niklaus Elmqvist, Andrew Vande Moere, Hans-Christian Jetter, Daniel Cernea, Harald Reiterer, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
Information Visualization, 10(4):327–340, 2011. doi: 10.1177/1473871611413180

Abstract

Despite typically receiving little emphasis in visualization research, interaction in visualization is the catalyst for the user’s dialogue with the data, and, ultimately, the user’s actual understanding and insight into this data. There are many possible reasons for this skewed balance between the visual and interactive aspects of a visualization. One reason is that interaction is an intangible concept that is difficult to design, quantify, and evaluate. Unlike for visual design, there are few examples that show visualization practitioners and researchers how to best design the interaction for a new visualization. In this paper, we attempt to address this issue by collecting examples of visualizations with “best-in-class” interaction and using them to extract practical design guidelines for future designers and researchers. We call this concept fluid interaction, and we propose a operational definition in terms of the direct manipulation and embodied interaction paradigms, the psychological concept of “flow”, and Norman’s gulfs of execution and evaluation.

Keywords: fluidity, flow, embodiment, design, information visualization, human-computer interaction

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Elmqvist:2011:FIf, author = {Elmqvist, Niklaus and Vande Moere, Andrew and Jetter, Hans-Christian and Cernea, Daniel and Reiterer, Harald and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Fluid Interaction for Information Visualization}, journal = {Information Visualization}, abstract = {Despite typically receiving little emphasis in visualization research, interaction in visualization is the catalyst for the user's dialogue with the data, and, ultimately, the user's actual understanding and insight into this data. There are many possible reasons for this skewed balance between the visual and interactive aspects of a visualization. One reason is that interaction is an intangible concept that is difficult to design, quantify, and evaluate. Unlike for visual design, there are few examples that show visualization practitioners and researchers how to best design the interaction for a new visualization. In this paper, we attempt to address this issue by collecting examples of visualizations with ``best-in-class'' interaction and using them to extract practical design guidelines for future designers and researchers. We call this concept fluid interaction, and we propose a operational definition in terms of the direct manipulation and embodied interaction paradigms, the psychological concept of ``flow'', and Norman's gulfs of execution and evaluation.}, keywords = {fluidity, flow, embodiment, design, information visualization, human-computer interaction}, volume = {10}, number = {4}, pages = {327--340}, year = {2011}, doi = {10.1177/1473871611413180}, }

Visual Analysis for Textual Relationships in Digital Forensic Evidence

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, David Wilson, Andrew S. Stamps, Josh Franck, Jeffrey Carver, and J. Edward Swan
Information Visualization, 10(2):134–144, 2011. doi: 10.1057/ivs.2010.15

Abstract

We present a visual analytics framework for exploring the textual relationships in computer forensics. Based on a task analysis study performed with practitioners, our tool addresses the inefficiency of searching for related text documents on a hard drive. Our framework searches both allocated and unallocated sectors for text and performs some pre-analysis processing; this information is then presented via a visualization that displays both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on the disk. We also present a case study that demonstrates our framework’s operation, and we report on an informal evaluation conducted with forensics analysts from the Mississippi State Attorney General’s Office and National Forensics Training Center.

Keywords: computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2011:VAf, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Wilson, David and Stamps, Andrew S. and Franck, Josh and Carver, Jeffrey and Swan, J. Edward}, title = {Visual Analysis for Textual Relationships in Digital Forensic Evidence}, journal = {Information Visualization}, abstract = {We present a visual analytics framework for exploring the textual relationships in computer forensics. Based on a task analysis study performed with practitioners, our tool addresses the inefficiency of searching for related text documents on a hard drive. Our framework searches both allocated and unallocated sectors for text and performs some pre-analysis processing; this information is then presented via a visualization that displays both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on the disk. We also present a case study that demonstrates our framework's operation, and we report on an informal evaluation conducted with forensics analysts from the Mississippi State Attorney General's Office and National Forensics Training Center.}, keywords = {computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds}, volume = {10}, number = {2}, pages = {134--144}, year = {2011}, doi = {10.1057/ivs.2010.15}, }

GOModeler—A tool for hypothesis-testing of functional genomics datasets

Prashanti Manda, McKinley Freeman, Susan Bridges, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Bindu Nanduri, Fiona McCarthy, and Shane Burgess
BMC Bioinformatics, 11(Suppl 6):29, 2010. doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-11-S6-S29

Abstract

Functional genomics technologies that measure genome expression at a global scale are accelerating biological knowledge discovery. Generating these high throughput datasets is relatively easy compared to the downstream functional modelling necessary for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern the biology under investigation. A number of publicly available ’discovery-based’ computational tools use the computationally amenable Gene Ontology (GO) for hypothesis generation. However, there are few tools that support hypothesis-based testing using the GO and none that support testing with user defined hypothesis terms.Here, we present GOModeler, a tool that enables researchers to conduct hypothesis-based testing of high throughput datasets using the GO. GOModeler summarizes the overall effect of a user defined gene/protein differential expression dataset on specific GO hypothesis terms selected by the user to describe a biological experiment. The design of the tool allows the user to complement the functional information in the GO with his/her domain specific expertise for comprehensive hypothesis testing.

Keywords: bioinformatics, GO, genomics, visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Manda:2010:GOModler, author = {Manda, Prashanti and Freeman, McKinley and Bridges, Susan and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Nanduri, Bindu and McCarthy, Fiona and Burgess, Shane}, title = {GOModeler---A tool for hypothesis-testing of functional genomics datasets}, journal = {BMC Bioinformatics}, abstract = {Functional genomics technologies that measure genome expression at a global scale are accelerating biological knowledge discovery. Generating these high throughput datasets is relatively easy compared to the downstream functional modelling necessary for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern the biology under investigation. A number of publicly available 'discovery-based' computational tools use the computationally amenable Gene Ontology (GO) for hypothesis generation. However, there are few tools that support hypothesis-based testing using the GO and none that support testing with user defined hypothesis terms.Here, we present GOModeler, a tool that enables researchers to conduct hypothesis-based testing of high throughput datasets using the GO. GOModeler summarizes the overall effect of a user defined gene/protein differential expression dataset on specific GO hypothesis terms selected by the user to describe a biological experiment. The design of the tool allows the user to complement the functional information in the GO with his/her domain specific expertise for comprehensive hypothesis testing.}, keywords = {bioinformatics, GO, genomics, visualization}, volume = {11}, number = {Suppl 6}, pages = {29}, year = {2010}, doi = {10.1186/1471-2105-11-S6-S29}, }

An Evaluation of Glyph Perception for Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Properties

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Yagneshwara S. Lanka, and J. Edward Swan II
Computer Graphics Forum, 29(3):1133–1142, 2010. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8659.2009.01711.x

Abstract

A perceptual study of four tensor glyphs for symmetric, real, traceless tensors was performed. Each glyph encodes three properties of the system: Orientation, uniaxiality (alignment along the direction of orientation), and biaxiality (alignment along a vector orthogonal to the orientation). Thirty users over two studies were asked to identify these three properties for each glyph type under a variety of permutations in order to evaluate the effectiveness of visually communicating the properties; response time was also measured. We discuss the significant differences found between the methods as guidance to the use of these glyphs for traceless tensor visualization.

Keywords: tensor visualization, evaluation, user study, glyphs

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2010:AEo, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Lanka, Yagneshwara S. and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {An Evaluation of Glyph Perception for Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Properties}, journal = {Computer Graphics Forum}, abstract = {A perceptual study of four tensor glyphs for symmetric, real, traceless tensors was performed. Each glyph encodes three properties of the system: Orientation, uniaxiality (alignment along the direction of orientation), and biaxiality (alignment along a vector orthogonal to the orientation). Thirty users over two studies were asked to identify these three properties for each glyph type under a variety of permutations in order to evaluate the effectiveness of visually communicating the properties; response time was also measured. We discuss the significant differences found between the methods as guidance to the use of these glyphs for traceless tensor visualization.}, keywords = {tensor visualization, evaluation, user study, glyphs}, volume = {29}, number = {3}, pages = {1133--1142}, year = {2010}, doi = {10.1111/j.1467-8659.2009.01711.x}, }

An Interactive Parallel Coordinates Technique Applied to a Tropical Cyclone Climate Analysis

Chad A. Steed, Patrick J. Fitzpatrick, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Amber Yancey, and J. Edward Swan II
Computers & Geosciences, 35(7):1529–1539, 2009. doi: 10.1016/j.cageo.2008.11.004

Abstract

A highly interactive visual analysis system is presented that is based on an enhanced variant of parallel coordinates -a multivariate information visualization technique. The system combines many variations of previously described visual interaction techniques such as dynamic axis scaling, conjunctive visual queries, statistical indicators, and aerial perspective shading. The system capabilities are demonstrated on a hurricane climate data set. This climate study corroborates the notion that enhanced visual analysis with parallel coordinates provides a deeper understanding when used in conjunction with traditional multiple regression analysis.

Keywords: parallel coordinates, hurricane, climate study, multivariate information visualization, geovisualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Steed:2009:AIP, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Yancey, Amber and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {An Interactive Parallel Coordinates Technique Applied to a Tropical Cyclone Climate Analysis}, journal = {Computers \& Geosciences}, abstract = {A highly interactive visual analysis system is presented that is based on an enhanced variant of parallel coordinates -a multivariate information visualization technique. The system combines many variations of previously described visual interaction techniques such as dynamic axis scaling, conjunctive visual queries, statistical indicators, and aerial perspective shading. The system capabilities are demonstrated on a hurricane climate data set. This climate study corroborates the notion that enhanced visual analysis with parallel coordinates provides a deeper understanding when used in conjunction with traditional multiple regression analysis. }, keywords = {parallel coordinates, hurricane, climate study, multivariate information visualization, geovisualization}, volume = {35}, number = {7}, pages = {1529--1539}, year = {2009}, doi = {10.1016/j.cageo.2008.11.004}, }

Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Andrew D. Lindeman, and Susan M. Bridges
BMC Bioinformatics, 10(Supplement 11):7, 2009. doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-10-S11-S7

Abstract

Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.

Keywords: information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2009:EVA, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Lindeman, Andrew D. and Bridges, Susan M.}, title = {Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments}, journal = {BMC Bioinformatics}, abstract = {Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.}, keywords = {information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains}, volume = {10}, number = {Supplement 11}, pages = {7}, year = {2009}, doi = {10.1186/1471-2105-10-S11-S7}, }

Tropical Cyclone Trend Analysis using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates and Statistical Analysis

Chad A. Steed, Patrick J. Fitzpatrick, J. Edward Swan II, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
Cartography and Geographic Information Science, 36(3):251–265, 2009. doi: 10.1559/152304009788988314

Abstract

This work presents, via an in-depth case study, how parallel coordinates coupled with statistical analysis can be used for more effective knowledge discovery and confirmation in complex, environmental data sets. Advanced visual interaction techniques such as dynamic axis scaling, conjunctive parallel coordinates, statistical indicators, and aerial perspective shading are combined into an interactive geovisual analytics system. Moreover, the system facilitates statistical processes such as stepwise regression and correlation analysis to assist in the identification and quantification of the most significant predictors for a particular dependent variable. Using a systematic workflow, this approach is demonstrated via a North Atlantic hurricane climate study in close collaboration with a domain expert. By revealing several important physical associations, the case study reveals that the visual analytics approach facilitates a deeper understanding of multidimensional climate data sets when compared to traditional techniques.

Keywords: climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Steed:2009:TCT, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J. and Swan II, J. Edward and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Tropical Cyclone Trend Analysis using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates and Statistical Analysis}, journal = {Cartography and Geographic Information Science}, abstract = {This work presents, via an in-depth case study, how parallel coordinates coupled with statistical analysis can be used for more effective knowledge discovery and confirmation in complex, environmental data sets. Advanced visual interaction techniques such as dynamic axis scaling, conjunctive parallel coordinates, statistical indicators, and aerial perspective shading are combined into an interactive geovisual analytics system. Moreover, the system facilitates statistical processes such as stepwise regression and correlation analysis to assist in the identification and quantification of the most significant predictors for a particular dependent variable. Using a systematic workflow, this approach is demonstrated via a North Atlantic hurricane climate study in close collaboration with a domain expert. By revealing several important physical associations, the case study reveals that the visual analytics approach facilitates a deeper understanding of multidimensional climate data sets when compared to traditional techniques. }, keywords = {climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics}, volume = {36}, number = {3}, pages = {251--265}, year = {2009}, doi = {10.1559/152304009788988314}, }

A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and Michael Gertz
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 13(2):357–369, 2007. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2007.28

Abstract

Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations—the depiction—and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.

Keywords: visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2007:AMa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Gertz, Michael}, title = {A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations---the depiction---and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.}, keywords = {visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization}, volume = {13}, number = {2}, pages = {357--369}, year = {2007}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2007.28}, }

Superellipsoid-based, Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Glyphs Motivated by Nematic Liquid Crystal Alignment Visualization

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Ketan Mehta
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 12(5):, 2006. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2006.133

Abstract

A glyph-based method for visualizing the nematic liquid crystal alignment tensor is introduced. Unlike previous approaches, the glyph is based upon physically-linked metrics, not offsets of the eigenvalues. These metrics, combined with a set of superellipsoid shapes, communicate both the strength of the crystal’s uniaxial alignment and the amount of biaxiality. With small modifications, our approach can visualize any real symmetric traceless tensor.

Keywords: scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2006:SbR, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Mehta, Ketan}, title = {Superellipsoid-based, Real Symmetric Traceless Tensor Glyphs Motivated by Nematic Liquid Crystal Alignment Visualization}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {A glyph-based method for visualizing the nematic liquid crystal alignment tensor is introduced. Unlike previous approaches, the glyph is based upon physically-linked metrics, not offsets of the eigenvalues. These metrics, combined with a set of superellipsoid shapes, communicate both the strength of the crystal's uniaxial alignment and the amount of biaxiality. With small modifications, our approach can visualize any real symmetric traceless tensor.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, tensor visualization, symmetric traceless tensor, nematic liquid crystals}, volume = {12}, number = {5}, pages = {}, year = {2006}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2006.133}, }

Detection and Visualization of Defects in 3D Unstructured Models of Nematic Liquid Crystals

Ketan Mehta and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 12(5):1045–1052, 2006. doi: 10.1109/TVCG.2006.133

Abstract

A method for the semi-automatic detection and visualization of defects in models of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) is introduced; this method is suitable for unstructured models, a previously unsolved problem. The detected defects—also known as disclinations—are regions were the alignment of the liquid crystal rapidly changes over space; these defects play a large role in the physical behavior of the NLC substrate. Defect detection is based upon a measure of total angular change of crystal orientation (the director) over a node neighborhood via the use of a nearest neighbor path. Visualizations based upon the detection algorithm clearly identifies complete defect regions as opposed to incomplete visual descriptions provided by cutting-plane and isosurface approaches. The introduced techniques are currently in use by scientists studying the dynamics of defect change.

Keywords: scientific visualization, disclination, nematic liquid crystal, defects, unstructured grid, feature extraction

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Mehta:2006:DaV, author = {Mehta, Ketan and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Detection and Visualization of Defects in 3D Unstructured Models of Nematic Liquid Crystals}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {A method for the semi-automatic detection and visualization of defects in models of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) is introduced; this method is suitable for unstructured models, a previously unsolved problem. The detected defects---also known as disclinations---are regions were the alignment of the liquid crystal rapidly changes over space; these defects play a large role in the physical behavior of the NLC substrate. Defect detection is based upon a measure of total angular change of crystal orientation (the director) over a node neighborhood via the use of a nearest neighbor path. Visualizations based upon the detection algorithm clearly identifies complete defect regions as opposed to incomplete visual descriptions provided by cutting-plane and isosurface approaches. The introduced techniques are currently in use by scientists studying the dynamics of defect change.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, disclination, nematic liquid crystal, defects, unstructured grid, feature extraction}, volume = {12}, number = {5}, pages = {1045--1052}, year = {2006}, doi = {10.1109/TVCG.2006.133}, }

Visual Data Analysis for Detecting Flaws and Intruders in Computer Network Systems

Soon Tee Teoh, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and S. Felix Wu
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 24(5):27–35, 2004. doi: 10.1109/MCG.2004.26

Abstract

To ensure the normal operation of a large computer network system, the common practice is to constantly collect system logs and analyze the network activities for detecting anomalies. Most of the analysis methods in use today are highly automated due to the enormous size of the collected data. Conventional automated methods are largely based on statistical modeling, and some employ machine learning. In this paper, we show interactive visualization as an alternative and effective data exploration method for understanding the complex behaviors of computer network systems. We describe three log-file analysis applications, and demonstrate how the use of our visualization-centered tools can lead to the discovery of flaws and intruders in the network systems.

Keywords: information visualization, intrusion detection, visual data mining, network visualization, internet routing stability

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Teoh:2004:VDA, author = {Teoh, Soon Tee and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Wu, S. Felix}, title = {Visual Data Analysis for Detecting Flaws and Intruders in Computer Network Systems}, journal = {IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications}, abstract = {To ensure the normal operation of a large computer network system, the common practice is to constantly collect system logs and analyze the network activities for detecting anomalies. Most of the analysis methods in use today are highly automated due to the enormous size of the collected data. Conventional automated methods are largely based on statistical modeling, and some employ machine learning. In this paper, we show interactive visualization as an alternative and effective data exploration method for understanding the complex behaviors of computer network systems. We describe three log-file analysis applications, and demonstrate how the use of our visualization-centered tools can lead to the discovery of flaws and intruders in the network systems.}, keywords = {information visualization, intrusion detection, visual data mining, network visualization, internet routing stability}, volume = {24}, number = {5}, pages = {27--35}, year = {2004}, doi = {10.1109/MCG.2004.26}, }

Deploying Web-based Visual Exploration Tools on the Grid

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Oliver Kreylos, John M. Shalf, Kwan-Liu Ma, Bernd Hamann, Kenneth I. Joy, and E. Wes Bethel
IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 23(2):40–50, 2003. doi: 10.1109/MCG.2003.1185579

Abstract

We discuss a web-based portal for the exploration, encapsulation, and dissemination of visualization results over the Grid. This portal integrates three components: an interface client for structured visualization exploration, a visualization web application to manage the generation and capture of the visualization results, and a centralized portal application server to access and manage grid resources. Our approach uses standard web technologies to make the system accessible with minimal user setup. We demonstrate the usefulness of the developed system using an example for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) data visualization.

Keywords: scientific visualization, grid-based computing, world-wide web, visualization interfaces, adaptive mesh refinement

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2003:DWV, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Kreylos, Oliver and Shalf, John M. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Hamann, Bernd and Joy, Kenneth I. and Bethel, E. Wes}, title = {Deploying Web-based Visual Exploration Tools on the Grid}, journal = {IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications}, abstract = {We discuss a web-based portal for the exploration, encapsulation, and dissemination of visualization results over the Grid. This portal integrates three components: an interface client for structured visualization exploration, a visualization web application to manage the generation and capture of the visualization results, and a centralized portal application server to access and manage grid resources. Our approach uses standard web technologies to make the system accessible with minimal user setup. We demonstrate the usefulness of the developed system using an example for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) data visualization.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, grid-based computing, world-wide web, visualization interfaces, adaptive mesh refinement}, volume = {23}, number = {2}, pages = {40--50}, year = {2003}, doi = {10.1109/MCG.2003.1185579}, }

Visualization Exploration And Encapsulation Via A Spreadsheet-Like Interface

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 7(3):275–287, 2001. doi: 10.1109/2945.942695

Abstract

Exploring complex, very large data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. Two types of audience benefit from such coherent organization and representation: first, the user of the visualization system can examine and evaluate their data more efficiently; second, collaborators or reviewers can quickly understand and extend the visualization. The needs of these two groups are addressed by the spreadsheet-like interface described in this paper. The interface represents a 2D window in a multidimensional visualization parameter space. Data is explored by navigating this space via the interface. The visualization space is presented to the user in a manner that clearly identifies which parameters correspond to which visualized result. Operations defined on this space can be applied which generate new parameters or results. Combined with a general-purpose interpreter, these functions can be utilized to quickly extract desired results. Finally, by encapsulating the visualization process, redundant exploration is eliminated and collaboration is facilitated. The efficacy of this novel interface is demonstrated through examples using a variety of data sets in different domains.

Keywords: spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, collaboration, information visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun-Kelly:2001:VEa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {Visualization Exploration And Encapsulation Via A Spreadsheet-Like Interface}, journal = {IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics}, abstract = {Exploring complex, very large data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. Two types of audience benefit from such coherent organization and representation: first, the user of the visualization system can examine and evaluate their data more efficiently; second, collaborators or reviewers can quickly understand and extend the visualization. The needs of these two groups are addressed by the spreadsheet-like interface described in this paper. The interface represents a 2D window in a multidimensional visualization parameter space. Data is explored by navigating this space via the interface. The visualization space is presented to the user in a manner that clearly identifies which parameters correspond to which visualized result. Operations defined on this space can be applied which generate new parameters or results. Combined with a general-purpose interpreter, these functions can be utilized to quickly extract desired results. Finally, by encapsulating the visualization process, redundant exploration is eliminated and collaboration is facilitated. The efficacy of this novel interface is demonstrated through examples using a variety of data sets in different domains. }, keywords = {spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, collaboration, information visualization}, volume = {7}, number = {3}, pages = {275--287}, year = {2001}, doi = {10.1109/2945.942695}, }

Computer model for Cryosurgery of the Prostate

Monika Jankun, T. J. Kelly, Amjad Zaim, Karen Young, Rick W. Keck, Steven H. Selman, and Jerzy Jankun
Computer Aided Surgery, 4(4):193–199, 1999. doi: 10.3109/10929089909148173

Abstract

The objective of this study was to devise an interactive tool to assist in cryoablation therapy through computer modeling, simulation, and visualization. CryoSim, a software package, accepts a set of acquired and processed three-dimensional ultrasound images, then models heat diffusion (formation of the iceball) based on numerical approximation of the heat equation and knowledge of the thermal properties of the underlying tissues. Results of cryoexperiments were found to be significantly similar to those generated by CryoSim. Therefore, CryoSim provides a viable technique for predicting the outcome of cryosurgery, and establishes a platform for future automation of cryosurgery.

Keywords: cryosurgery, prostate cancer, three-dimensional ultrasound, computer modeling

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BibTeX Citation

@article{Jankun:1999:CMf, author = {Jankun, Monika and Kelly, T. J. and Zaim, Amjad and Young, Karen and Keck, Rick W. and Selman, Steven H. and Jankun, Jerzy}, title = {Computer model for Cryosurgery of the Prostate}, journal = {Computer Aided Surgery}, abstract = {The objective of this study was to devise an interactive tool to assist in cryoablation therapy through computer modeling, simulation, and visualization. CryoSim, a software package, accepts a set of acquired and processed three-dimensional ultrasound images, then models heat diffusion (formation of the iceball) based on numerical approximation of the heat equation and knowledge of the thermal properties of the underlying tissues. Results of cryoexperiments were found to be significantly similar to those generated by CryoSim. Therefore, CryoSim provides a viable technique for predicting the outcome of cryosurgery, and establishes a platform for future automation of cryosurgery.}, keywords = {cryosurgery, prostate cancer, three-dimensional ultrasound, computer modeling}, volume = {4}, number = {4}, pages = {193--199}, year = {1999}, doi = {10.3109/10929089909148173}, }

Refereed conference papers

Broadening Participation in Computing Through Curricular Changes

Donna S. Reese, Sarah Lee, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, and Lisa Henderson
In Proceedings of the 2014 ASEE Southeast Conference, pp. , 2014 ( acceptance rate).

Abstract

Keywords:

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Reese:2014:BPi, author = {Reese, Donna S. and Lee, Sarah and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Henderson, Lisa}, title = {Broadening Participation in Computing Through Curricular Changes}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2014 ASEE Southeast Conference}, editor = {[u'']}, abstract = {}, keywords = {}, pages = {}, year = {2014}, acceptance = {}, doi = {}, }

Impact on Retention from a Change in Undergraduate Computing Curricula

Donna Reese, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Lisa Henderson, and Sarah Lee
In Proceedings of the 2013 ASEE Southeast Conference, pp. , 2013 ( acceptance rate).

Abstract

Mississippi State University (MSU), like many other institutions across the country, has seen a significant decline in the number of computing majors since the early 2000’s when the dot com crash caused many students to shy away from majors involving computing. In addition, the diversity of the students who have remained in the field has decreased, particularly with female students making up a smaller and smaller percentage of majors in these fields. In the 2008-09 year a significant effort was made to re-design the introductory programming sequence in the Computer Science and Engineering Department. This introductory programming sequence is taken by students in computer science, software engineering, computer engineering and electrical engineering. In addition, an introductory CSE course was added for computer science and software engineering majors. Data shows that this redesign has had a positive impact on the retention of students within the majors served by this sequence.

Keywords: retention, computing

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Reese:2013:IoR, author = {Reese, Donna and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Henderson, Lisa and Lee, Sarah}, title = {Impact on Retention from a Change in Undergraduate Computing Curricula}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2013 ASEE Southeast Conference}, editor = {[u'']}, abstract = {Mississippi State University (MSU), like many other institutions across the country, has seen a significant decline in the number of computing majors since the early 2000's when the dot com crash caused many students to shy away from majors involving computing. In addition, the diversity of the students who have remained in the field has decreased, particularly with female students making up a smaller and smaller percentage of majors in these fields. In the 2008-09 year a significant effort was made to re-design the introductory programming sequence in the Computer Science and Engineering Department. This introductory programming sequence is taken by students in computer science, software engineering, computer engineering and electrical engineering. In addition, an introductory CSE course was added for computer science and software engineering majors. Data shows that this redesign has had a positive impact on the retention of students within the majors served by this sequence.}, keywords = {retention, computing}, pages = {}, year = {2013}, acceptance = {}, doi = {}, }

A Visual Analytic Framework for Exploring Relationships in Textual Contents of Digital Forensics Evidence

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, David Wilson, Andrew S. Stamps, Josh Franck, Jeffrey Carver, and J. Edward Swan II
In Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security, pp. 39–44, 2009 (6/13 [46%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/VIZSEC.2009.5375541

Abstract

We describe the development of a set of tools for analyzing the textual contents of digital forensic evidence for the purpose of enhancing an investigator’s ability to discover information quickly and efficiently. By examining the textual contents of files and unallocated space, relationships between sets of files and clusters can be formed based on the information that they contain. Using the information gathered from the evidence through the analysis tool, the visualization tool can be used to search through the evidence in an organized and efficient manner. The visualization depicts both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on disk. We also discuss a task analysis with forensics officers to motivate the design.

Keywords: computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2009:AVA, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Wilson, David and Stamps, Andrew S. and Franck, Josh and Carver, Jeffrey and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {A Visual Analytic Framework for Exploring Relationships in Textual Contents of Digital Forensics Evidence}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security}, editor = {Frincke, Deborah A. and Gates, Carrie E. and Goodall, John R.}, abstract = {We describe the development of a set of tools for analyzing the textual contents of digital forensic evidence for the purpose of enhancing an investigator's ability to discover information quickly and efficiently. By examining the textual contents of files and unallocated space, relationships between sets of files and clusters can be formed based on the information that they contain. Using the information gathered from the evidence through the analysis tool, the visualization tool can be used to search through the evidence in an organized and efficient manner. The visualization depicts both the frequency of relevant terms and their location on disk. We also discuss a task analysis with forensics officers to motivate the design.}, keywords = {computer forensics, visualization, visual analytics, treemaps, tag clouds}, pages = {39--44}, year = {2009}, acceptance = {6/13 [46%]}, doi = {10.1109/VIZSEC.2009.5375541}, }

Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive Parallel Coordinates

Chad A. Steed, J. Edward Swan II, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, and Patrick J. Fitzpatrick
In Proceedings of the IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST 2009), pp. 19–26, 2009 (26/69 [38%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/VAST.2009.5332586

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive multivariate representations with information from statistical processes in the domain of weather data analysis. Statistical regression, correlation analysis, and descriptive statistical calculations are integrated via graphical indicators into an enhanced parallel coordinates system, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX). These statistical indicators, which highlight significant associations in the data, are complemented with interactive visual analysis capabilities. The resulting system allows a smooth, interactive, and highly visual workflow. The system’s utility is demonstrated with an extensive hurricane climate study that was conducted by a hurricane expert. In the study, the expert used a new data set of environmental weather data, composed of 28 independent variables, to predict annual hurricane activity. MDX shows the Atlantic Meridional Mode increases the explained variance of hurricane seasonal activity by 7-15% and removes less significant variables used in earlier studies. The findings and feedback from the expert (1) validate the utility of the data set for hurricane prediction, and (2) indicate that the integration of statistical processes with interactive parallel coordinates, as implemented in our system, addresses both deficiencies in traditional weather data analysis and exhibits some of the expected benefits of visual data analysis.

Keywords: climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2009:GAo, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Swan II, J. Edward and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.}, title = {Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive Parallel Coordinates}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE Symposium on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST 2009)}, editor = {[u'']}, abstract = {This paper demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive multivariate representations with information from statistical processes in the domain of weather data analysis. Statistical regression, correlation analysis, and descriptive statistical calculations are integrated via graphical indicators into an enhanced parallel coordinates system, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX). These statistical indicators, which highlight significant associations in the data, are complemented with interactive visual analysis capabilities. The resulting system allows a smooth, interactive, and highly visual workflow. The system's utility is demonstrated with an extensive hurricane climate study that was conducted by a hurricane expert. In the study, the expert used a new data set of environmental weather data, composed of 28 independent variables, to predict annual hurricane activity. MDX shows the Atlantic Meridional Mode increases the explained variance of hurricane seasonal activity by 7-15\% and removes less significant variables used in earlier studies. The findings and feedback from the expert (1) validate the utility of the data set for hurricane prediction, and (2) indicate that the integration of statistical processes with interactive parallel coordinates, as implemented in our system, addresses both deficiencies in traditional weather data analysis and exhibits some of the expected benefits of visual data analysis. }, keywords = {climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics}, pages = {19--26}, year = {2009}, acceptance = {26/69 [38%]}, doi = {10.1109/VAST.2009.5332586}, }

Show Me How You See: Lessons from Studying Computer Forensics Experts for Visualization

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Josh Franck, David Wilson, Jeffrey Carver, David Dampier, and J. Edward Swan II
In Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security, pp. 80–86, 2008 (18/27 [67%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1007/978-3-540-85933-8_8

Abstract

As the first part of a Analyze-Visualize-Validate cycle, we have initiated a domain analysis of email computer forensics to determine where visualization may be beneficial. To this end, we worked with police detectives and other forensics professionals. However, the process of designing and executing such a study with real-world experts has been a non-trivial task. This paper presents our efforts in this area and the lessons learned as guidance for other practitioners.

Keywords: computer forensics, visual analytics, information visualization, security visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2008:SMH, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Franck, Josh and Wilson, David and Carver, Jeffrey and Dampier, David and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {Show Me How You See: Lessons from Studying Computer Forensics Experts for Visualization}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop on Visualization for Computer Security}, editor = {Goodall, John and Conti, Gregory and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, abstract = {As the first part of a Analyze-Visualize-Validate cycle, we have initiated a domain analysis of email computer forensics to determine where visualization may be beneficial. To this end, we worked with police detectives and other forensics professionals. However, the process of designing and executing such a study with real-world experts has been a non-trivial task. This paper presents our efforts in this area and the lessons learned as guidance for other practitioners.}, keywords = {computer forensics, visual analytics, information visualization, security visualization}, pages = {80--86}, year = {2008}, acceptance = {18/27 [67%]}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-85933-8_8}, }

A Scalability Study of Web-Native Information Visualization

Donald W. Johnson and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2008, pp. 163–168, 2008 (34/85 [40%] acceptance rate).

Abstract

Several web-native information visualization methods (SVG, HTML5’s Canvas, native HTML) are studied to contrast their performances at different data scales. Using Java implementations of parallel coordinates and squarified treemaps for comparison, we explore the design space of these web-based technologies in order to determine what design trade-offs are required.

Keywords: information visualization, web-based visualization, parallel coordinates, treemap, Java, scalable vector graphics, SVG, HTML Canvas, asynchronous Javascript, AJAX

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Johnson:2008:ASS, author = {Johnson, Donald W. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {A Scalability Study of Web-Native Information Visualization}, booktitle = {Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2008}, editor = {Shaw, Chris and Bartram, Lyn}, abstract = {Several web-native information visualization methods (SVG, HTML5's Canvas, native HTML) are studied to contrast their performances at different data scales. Using Java implementations of parallel coordinates and squarified treemaps for comparison, we explore the design space of these web-based technologies in order to determine what design trade-offs are required.}, keywords = {information visualization, web-based visualization, parallel coordinates, treemap, Java, scalable vector graphics, SVG, HTML Canvas, asynchronous Javascript, AJAX}, pages = {163--168}, year = {2008}, acceptance = {34/85 [40%]}, doi = {}, }

Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.
In Proceedings of the Second International Provenance and Annotation Workshop, pp. 78–91, 2008 (29/40 [72%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1007/978-3-540-89965-5_10

Abstract

Visualization exploration is an iterative process of setting parameters, rendering, and evaluating results. This process can be recorded and analyzed in order to make visualization exploration more efficient and more effective. This work describes methods for visualizing the visualization process using new visualization process graphs; several visualization process relations are introduced to construct these graphs. These methods were used to analyze and improve a network routing visualization, and the results of this analysis are presented. Through this analysis, redundant exploration was quickly identified and eliminated.

Keywords: visualization process, visualization analysis, visualization systems, information visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2008:UVP, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Second International Provenance and Annotation Workshop}, editor = {Freire, Juliana and Moreau, Luc}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is an iterative process of setting parameters, rendering, and evaluating results. This process can be recorded and analyzed in order to make visualization exploration more efficient and more effective. This work describes methods for visualizing the visualization process using new visualization process graphs; several visualization process relations are introduced to construct these graphs. These methods were used to analyze and improve a network routing visualization, and the results of this analysis are presented. Through this analysis, redundant exploration was quickly identified and eliminated.}, keywords = {visualization process, visualization analysis, visualization systems, information visualization}, pages = {78--91}, year = {2008}, acceptance = {29/40 [72%]}, doi = {10.1007/978-3-540-89965-5_10}, }

CluVis: Dual-domain Visual Exploration of Cluster/Network Metadata

Christopher Waters, Jonathan Howell, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of the 45th Annual Southeast Regional Conference (ACMSE 2007), pp. 272–277, 2007 (89/151 [59%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1145/1233341.1233390

Abstract

CluVis, a prototype for visual monitoring and exploration of cluster and network metadata, is introducted. CluVis builds upon interactively added charts of cluster/network metadata (e.g., packets received, processor activity, etc.) created by the user. CluVis uses a dual-domain approach that depicts the active chart on each node of a computer cluster or communication network in one view while displaying the relationships between explored charts in another view. Thus, CluVis facilitates a hypothesis-driven exploration of computer system metadata for visual analysis.

Keywords: security visualization, information visualization, visual analysis, clusters, networks, metadata

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Waters:2007:CVD, author = {Waters, Christopher and Howell, Jonathan and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {CluVis: Dual-domain Visual Exploration of Cluster/Network Metadata}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 45th Annual Southeast Regional Conference (ACMSE 2007)}, editor = {Dicheva, Darina and Pauca, Pa{\'u}l}, abstract = {CluVis, a prototype for visual monitoring and exploration of cluster and network metadata, is introducted. CluVis builds upon interactively added charts of cluster/network metadata (e.g., packets received, processor activity, etc.) created by the user. CluVis uses a dual-domain approach that depicts the active chart on each node of a computer cluster or communication network in one view while displaying the relationships between explored charts in another view. Thus, CluVis facilitates a hypothesis-driven exploration of computer system metadata for visual analysis.}, keywords = {security visualization, information visualization, visual analysis, clusters, networks, metadata}, pages = {272--277}, year = {2007}, acceptance = {89/151 [59%]}, doi = {10.1145/1233341.1233390}, }

MoireTrees: Visualization and Interaction for Multi-Hierarchical Data

Mahnas Jean Mohammadi-Aragh and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of the Joint Eurographics/IEEE VGTC Symposium on Visualization 2005, pp. 231–238, 2005 (36/102 [35%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.2312/VisSym/EuroVis05/231-238

Abstract

Visualizing hierarchical data is one of the core areas of information visualization. Most of these techniques focus on single hierarchies—hierarchies with a single root element and a single path to each element. In contrast, this work focuses on the browsing of multi-hierarchies—hierarchies with multiple roots or multiple paths per element. A radial focus+context display algorithm and interaction methods are introduced to explore such multi-hierarchical data. A series of examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our new visualization.

Keywords: information visualization, focus+context, radial layout, hierarchical visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Mohammadi-Aragh:2005:MVa, author = {Mohammadi-Aragh, Mahnas Jean and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {MoireTrees: Visualization and Interaction for Multi-Hierarchical Data}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Joint Eurographics/IEEE VGTC Symposium on Visualization 2005}, editor = {Brodlie, Ken and Duke, David and Joy, Kenneth I.}, abstract = {Visualizing hierarchical data is one of the core areas of information visualization. Most of these techniques focus on single hierarchies---hierarchies with a single root element and a single path to each element. In contrast, this work focuses on the browsing of multi-hierarchies---hierarchies with multiple roots or multiple paths per element. A radial focus+context display algorithm and interaction methods are introduced to explore such multi-hierarchical data. A series of examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our new visualization.}, keywords = {information visualization, focus+context, radial layout, hierarchical visualization}, pages = {231--238}, year = {2005}, acceptance = {36/102 [35%]}, doi = {10.2312/VisSym/EuroVis05/231-238}, }

MoireGraphs: Radial Focus+Context Visualization and Interaction for Graphs with Visual Nodes

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
In Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization, pp. 59–66, 2003 (23/90 [26%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/INFVIS.2003.1249009

Abstract

Graph and tree visualization techniques enable interactive exploration of complex relations while communicating topology. However, most existing techniques have not been designed for situations where visual information such as images is also present at each node and must be displayed. This paper presents MoireGraphs to address this need. MoireGraphs combine a new focus+context radial graph layout with a suite of interaction techniques (focus strength changing, radial rotation, level highlighting, secondary foci, animated transitions and node information) to assist in the exploration of graphs with visual nodes. The method is scalable to hundreds of displayed visual nodes.

Keywords: information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, graph drawing

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2003:MRF, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {MoireGraphs: Radial Focus+Context Visualization and Interaction for Graphs with Visual Nodes}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2003 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization}, editor = {Munzner, Tamara and North, Stephen}, abstract = {Graph and tree visualization techniques enable interactive exploration of complex relations while communicating topology. However, most existing techniques have not been designed for situations where visual information such as images is also present at each node and must be displayed. This paper presents MoireGraphs to address this need. MoireGraphs combine a new focus+context radial graph layout with a suite of interaction techniques (focus strength changing, radial rotation, level highlighting, secondary foci, animated transitions and node information) to assist in the exploration of graphs with visual nodes. The method is scalable to hundreds of displayed visual nodes. }, keywords = {information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, graph drawing}, pages = {59--66}, year = {2003}, acceptance = {23/90 [26%]}, doi = {10.1109/INFVIS.2003.1249009}, }

A Model for the Visualization Exploration Process

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and Michael Gertz
In Proceedings of the the 13th IEEE Conference on Visualization (Vis ’02), pp. 323–330, 2002 (58/178 [33%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/VISUAL.2002.1183791

Abstract

The current state of the art in visualization research places a strong emphasis on different techniques to derive insight from disparate types of data. However, little work has investigated the visualization process itself. The information content of the visualization process—the results, history, and relationships between those results—is addressed by this work. A characterization of the visualization process is discussed, leading to a general model of the visualization exploration process. The model, based upon a new parameter derivation calculus, can be used for automated reporting, analysis, or visualized directly. An XML-based language for expressing visualization sessions using the model is also described. These sessions can then be shared and reused by collaborators. The model, along with the XML representation, provides an effective means to utilize the information within the visualization process to further data exploration.

Keywords: visualization process, visualization models, visualization systems, scientific visualization, information visualization, collaboration, XML

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2002:AMf, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Gertz, Michael}, title = {A Model for the Visualization Exploration Process}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the the 13th IEEE Conference on Visualization (Vis '02)}, editor = {Moorhead, Robert J. and Gross, Markus and Joy, Kenneth I.}, abstract = {The current state of the art in visualization research places a strong emphasis on different techniques to derive insight from disparate types of data. However, little work has investigated the visualization process itself. The information content of the visualization process---the results, history, and relationships between those results---is addressed by this work. A characterization of the visualization process is discussed, leading to a general model of the visualization exploration process. The model, based upon a new parameter derivation calculus, can be used for automated reporting, analysis, or visualized directly. An XML-based language for expressing visualization sessions using the model is also described. These sessions can then be shared and reused by collaborators. The model, along with the XML representation, provides an effective means to utilize the information within the visualization process to further data exploration.}, keywords = {visualization process, visualization models, visualization systems, scientific visualization, information visualization, collaboration, XML}, pages = {323--330}, year = {2002}, acceptance = {58/178 [33%]}, doi = {10.1109/VISUAL.2002.1183791}, }

A Study of Transfer Functions Generation for Time-Varying Volume Data

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
In Volume Graphics 2001: Proceedings of the Joint IEEE TCVG and Eurographics Workshop, pp. 51–68, 2001 (27/45 [60%] acceptance rate).

Abstract

The proper usage and creation of transfer functions for time-varying data sets is an often ignored problem in volume visualization. Although methods and guidelines exist for time-invariant data, little formal study for the time-varying case has been performed. This paper examines this problem, and reports the study that we have conducted to determine how the dynamic behavior of time-varying data may be captured by a single or small set of transfer functions. The criteria which dictate when more than one transfer function is needed were also investigated. Four data sets with different temporal characteristics were used for our study. Results obtained using two different classes of methods are discussed, along with lessons learned. These methods, including a new multi-resolution opacity map approach, can be used for semi-automatic generation of transfer functions to explore large-scale time-varying data sets.

Keywords: transfer function generation, time-varying data, volume rendering, visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2001:ASo, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {A Study of Transfer Functions Generation for Time-Varying Volume Data}, booktitle = {Volume Graphics 2001: Proceedings of the Joint IEEE TCVG and Eurographics Workshop}, editor = {Mueller, Klaus and Kaufman, Arie}, abstract = {The proper usage and creation of transfer functions for time-varying data sets is an often ignored problem in volume visualization. Although methods and guidelines exist for time-invariant data, little formal study for the time-varying case has been performed. This paper examines this problem, and reports the study that we have conducted to determine how the dynamic behavior of time-varying data may be captured by a single or small set of transfer functions. The criteria which dictate when more than one transfer function is needed were also investigated. Four data sets with different temporal characteristics were used for our study. Results obtained using two different classes of methods are discussed, along with lessons learned. These methods, including a new multi-resolution opacity map approach, can be used for semi-automatic generation of transfer functions to explore large-scale time-varying data sets.}, keywords = {transfer function generation, time-varying data, volume rendering, visualization}, pages = {51--68}, year = {2001}, acceptance = {27/45 [60%]}, doi = {}, }

A Spreadsheet Interface for Visualization Exploration

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
In Proceedings of the 11th IEEE Conference on Visualization (Vis ’00), pp. 69–76, 2000 (52/151 [34%] acceptance rate). doi: 10.1109/VISUAL.2000.885678

Abstract

As the size and complexity of data sets continues to increase, the development of user interfaces and interaction techniques that expedite the process of exploring that data must receive new attention. Regardless of the speed of rendering, it is important to coherently organize the visual process of exploration: this information both grants insights about the data to a user and can be used by collaborators to understand the results. To fulfill these needs, we present a spreadsheet-like interface to data exploration. The interface displays a 2-dimensional window into visualization parameter space which users manipulate as they search for desired results. Through tabular organization and a clear correspondence between parameters and results, the interface eases the discovery, comparison and analysis of the underlying data. Users can utilize operators and the integrated interpreter to further explore and automate the visualization process; using a method introduced in this paper, these operations can be applied to “cells” in different “stacks” of the interface. Via illustrations using a variety of data sets, we demonstrate the efficacy of this novel interface.

Keywords: spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, volume rendering

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2000:ASI, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {A Spreadsheet Interface for Visualization Exploration}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the 11th IEEE Conference on Visualization (Vis '00)}, editor = {Ertl, Thomas and Hamann, Bernd and Varshney, Amitabh}, abstract = {As the size and complexity of data sets continues to increase, the development of user interfaces and interaction techniques that expedite the process of exploring that data must receive new attention. Regardless of the speed of rendering, it is important to coherently organize the visual process of exploration: this information both grants insights about the data to a user and can be used by collaborators to understand the results. To fulfill these needs, we present a spreadsheet-like interface to data exploration. The interface displays a 2-dimensional window into visualization parameter space which users manipulate as they search for desired results. Through tabular organization and a clear correspondence between parameters and results, the interface eases the discovery, comparison and analysis of the underlying data. Users can utilize operators and the integrated interpreter to further explore and automate the visualization process; using a method introduced in this paper, these operations can be applied to ``cells'' in different ``stacks'' of the interface. Via illustrations using a variety of data sets, we demonstrate the efficacy of this novel interface.}, keywords = {spreadsheets, user interfaces, knowledge representation, scientific visualization, visualization systems, volume rendering}, pages = {69--76}, year = {2000}, acceptance = {52/151 [34%]}, doi = {10.1109/VISUAL.2000.885678}, }

Refereed abstracts

GPU-Assisted Visual Analysis and Categorization of Ensemble Conflict

Donald W. Johnson and T.J. Jankun-Kelly
In IEEE Information Visualization 2016 Posters, 2016.

Abstract

Analysis of multiple overlapping data scenes is a challenging problem with tension between clearly identifying and exploring significant overlaps & conflicts. Two areas where this problem occurs is when dealing with ensemble data from physical event simulation and when viewing multiple flood scenes that occur in an area of interest. In order to allow easier analysis of scenes with multiple overlapping data layers, we introduce a visualization system designed to aid in the analysis of such scenes. It allows the user to both see where different data sets agree, and categorize areas of disagreement based on participating surfaces in each area. The results are stable with regard to render order and GPU acceleration via OpenCL allows interaction with data large datasets. This interactivity is further enhanced by data streaming which allows datasets too large to be loaded directly onto the GPU to be processed. After demonstrating our approach on a diverse set of ensemble datasets, we provide feedback from expert users.

Keywords:

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Johnson:2016:GAV, author = {Johnson, Donald W. and Jankun-Kelly, T.J.}, title = {GPU-Assisted Visual Analysis and Categorization of Ensemble Conflict}, booktitle = {IEEE Information Visualization 2016 Posters}, abstract = {Analysis of multiple overlapping data scenes is a challenging problem with tension between clearly identifying and exploring significant overlaps \& conflicts. Two areas where this problem occurs is when dealing with ensemble data from physical event simulation and when viewing multiple flood scenes that occur in an area of interest. In order to allow easier analysis of scenes with multiple overlapping data layers, we introduce a visualization system designed to aid in the analysis of such scenes. It allows the user to both see where different data sets agree, and categorize areas of disagreement based on participating surfaces in each area. The results are stable with regard to render order and GPU acceleration via OpenCL allows interaction with data large datasets. This interactivity is further enhanced by data streaming which allows datasets too large to be loaded directly onto the GPU to be processed. After demonstrating our approach on a diverse set of ensemble datasets, we provide feedback from expert users. }, keywords = {}, year = {2016}, }

Web-Based Visualization for Computational Biology Expression Atlases

Jesse Farek, Juan Castillo, Audrey Musselman-Brown, Swapnik Shah, Fiona McCarthy, Jianxia Xue, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society, Posters, 2014.

Abstract

We present our work-in-progress examining novel methods for the visual analysis of genomic expression atlases. Understanding the molecular basis for regulating key biological processes such as transcription, translation, and genetic variation is vital. A gene expression atlas provides information about when and where such products are expressed. These atlases are very large - the bovine atlas contains 7.2 million unique 20 base transcript tags profiled from 81 tissues - making analysis difficult. In addition, current tools are cumbersome and do not facilitate cross-tissue or similar comparison. Our focus+context method allows multiple side-by-side comparisons while providing context for other regions of expression. Each expression track is displayed with the genome and may be zoomed in for finer detail; a comparison tool allows for more exact examination between tracks. Neighboring genes are displayed in reduced detail with markers indicating expression levels of interest; these can be quickly navigated to via clicking or selection via a context-aware search. Based upon feedback from our biologist colleagues, we are adding statistical summary comparison tracks and multi-chromosomal analysis. The interface is completely web-based for easy deployment.

Keywords: genome, atlas, visualization, d3

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Farek:2014:WBV, author = {Farek, Jesse and Castillo, Juan and Musselman-Brown, Audrey and Shah, Swapnik and McCarthy, Fiona and Xue, Jianxia and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Web-Based Visualization for Computational Biology Expression Atlases}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society, Posters}, abstract = {We present our work-in-progress examining novel methods for the visual analysis of genomic expression atlases. Understanding the molecular basis for regulating key biological processes such as transcription, translation, and genetic variation is vital. A gene expression atlas provides information about when and where such products are expressed. These atlases are very large - the bovine atlas contains 7.2 million unique 20 base transcript tags profiled from 81 tissues - making analysis difficult. In addition, current tools are cumbersome and do not facilitate cross-tissue or similar comparison. Our focus+context method allows multiple side-by-side comparisons while providing context for other regions of expression. Each expression track is displayed with the genome and may be zoomed in for finer detail; a comparison tool allows for more exact examination between tracks. Neighboring genes are displayed in reduced detail with markers indicating expression levels of interest; these can be quickly navigated to via clicking or selection via a context-aware search. Based upon feedback from our biologist colleagues, we are adding statistical summary comparison tracks and multi-chromosomal analysis. The interface is completely web-based for easy deployment.}, keywords = {genome, atlas, visualization, d3}, year = {2014}, }

A Tool for the Ravpid Visual Interrogation & Triage of Alerts

Peter Curstis, Nathan Phillips, Daniel Simpkins, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In VizSec 2014 Posters, 2014.

Abstract

Keywords: security visualization, snorth, triage

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Curtis:2014:ATf, author = {Curstis, Peter and Phillips, Nathan and Simpkins, Daniel and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {A Tool for the Ravpid Visual Interrogation \& Triage of Alerts}, booktitle = {VizSec 2014 Posters}, abstract = {}, keywords = {security visualization, snorth, triage}, year = {2014}, }

A Design Space for Heterodox Methods in Information Visualization

Andrew S. Stamps and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In IEEE Information Visualization 2014 Posters, 2014.

Abstract

Keywords: information visualization, illustrative visualization, artistic methods

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Stamps:2014:ADS, author = {Stamps, Andrew S. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {A Design Space for Heterodox Methods in Information Visualization}, booktitle = {IEEE Information Visualization 2014 Posters}, abstract = {}, keywords = {information visualization, illustrative visualization, artistic methods}, year = {2014}, }

Focus+Context Visualization for Computational Biology Expression Atlases

Juan Castillo, Jesse Farek, Audrey Musselman-Brown, Swapnik Shah, Fiona McCarthy, Jianxia Xue, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In IEEE Visualization 2013 Poster Compendium (BioVis Posters), 2013.

Abstract

We present our work-in-progress examining novel methods for the visual analysis of genomic expression atlases. Understanding the molecular basis for regulating key biological processes such as transcription, translation, and genetic variation is vital. A gene expression atlas provides information about when and where such products are expressed. These atlases are very large - the bovine atlas contains 7.2 million unique 20 base transcript tags profiled from 81 tissues - making analysis difficult. In addition, current tools are cumbersome and do not facilitate cross-tissue or similar comparison. Our focus+context method allows multiple side-by-side comparisons while providing context for other regions of expression. Each expression track is displayed with the genome and may be zoomed in for finer detail; a comparison tool allows for more exact examination between tracks. Neighboring genes are displayed in reduced detail with markers indicating expression levels of interest; these can be quickly navigated to via clicking or selection via a context-aware search. Based upon feedback from our biologist colleagues, we are adding statistical summary comparison tracks and multi-chromosomal analysis. The interface is completely web-based for easy deployment.

Keywords: genome, atlas, visualization, d3

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Castillo:2013:FCV, author = {Castillo, Juan and Farek, Jesse and Musselman-Brown, Audrey and Shah, Swapnik and McCarthy, Fiona and Xue, Jianxia and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Focus+Context Visualization for Computational Biology Expression Atlases}, booktitle = {IEEE Visualization 2013 Poster Compendium (BioVis Posters)}, abstract = {We present our work-in-progress examining novel methods for the visual analysis of genomic expression atlases. Understanding the molecular basis for regulating key biological processes such as transcription, translation, and genetic variation is vital. A gene expression atlas provides information about when and where such products are expressed. These atlases are very large - the bovine atlas contains 7.2 million unique 20 base transcript tags profiled from 81 tissues - making analysis difficult. In addition, current tools are cumbersome and do not facilitate cross-tissue or similar comparison. Our focus+context method allows multiple side-by-side comparisons while providing context for other regions of expression. Each expression track is displayed with the genome and may be zoomed in for finer detail; a comparison tool allows for more exact examination between tracks. Neighboring genes are displayed in reduced detail with markers indicating expression levels of interest; these can be quickly navigated to via clicking or selection via a context-aware search. Based upon feedback from our biologist colleagues, we are adding statistical summary comparison tracks and multi-chromosomal analysis. The interface is completely web-based for easy deployment.}, keywords = {genome, atlas, visualization, d3}, year = {2013}, }

Illustrative Visualization of Hurricane Advisory Information

Chad A. Steed, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, J. Edward Swan II, and Robert J. Moorhead
In IEEE Visualization 2009 Poster Compendium, 2009.

Abstract

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) Tropical Cyclone Advisories contain several heterogeneous data types that are difficult to represent graphically in a single image. However, the understanding of these statements is vital for human safety in areas that are regularly affected by these devastating storms. Thus, the motivation behind the current work is to develop new graphical representations of the advisory information using a single, coherent image, that conveys the past and present information about a particular storm of interest. Inspired by artistic brush strokes, we have developed illustrative visualization techniques for representing the advisories. The NHC website represents wind swath information from past advisories related to each storm graphically as color-filled polygons. Other advisory information, such as storm position and intensity forecasts, are available in separate plots on the website. However, visualization research studies have shown that using separate plots can significantly hinder the ability to discover patterns in multidimensional analyses, especially when looking for combinations of conditions [2]. Furthermore, the use of color-filled polygons makes it difficult to encode additional information in the plot due to layer occlusion issues. Our new illustrative visualization techniques are designed to address these issues by mapping several of the advisory data attributes to the visual features of artistic brush strokes. By condensing the NHC advisory parameters into a single image, the current illustrative visualization method yields a promising approach to the dispensation of this vital information.

Keywords: artistic brush strokes, tropical cyclones, Hurricane Katrina, temporal fading, illustrative visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2009:IVo, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Swan II, J. Edward and Moorhead, Robert J.}, title = {Illustrative Visualization of Hurricane Advisory Information}, booktitle = {IEEE Visualization 2009 Poster Compendium}, abstract = {The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Hurricane Center's (NHC) Tropical Cyclone Advisories contain several heterogeneous data types that are difficult to represent graphically in a single image. However, the understanding of these statements is vital for human safety in areas that are regularly affected by these devastating storms. Thus, the motivation behind the current work is to develop new graphical representations of the advisory information using a single, coherent image, that conveys the past and present information about a particular storm of interest. Inspired by artistic brush strokes, we have developed illustrative visualization techniques for representing the advisories. The NHC website represents wind swath information from past advisories related to each storm graphically as color-filled polygons. Other advisory information, such as storm position and intensity forecasts, are available in separate plots on the website. However, visualization research studies have shown that using separate plots can significantly hinder the ability to discover patterns in multidimensional analyses, especially when looking for combinations of conditions [2]. Furthermore, the use of color-filled polygons makes it difficult to encode additional information in the plot due to layer occlusion issues. Our new illustrative visualization techniques are designed to address these issues by mapping several of the advisory data attributes to the visual features of artistic brush strokes. By condensing the NHC advisory parameters into a single image, the current illustrative visualization method yields a promising approach to the dispensation of this vital information.}, keywords = {artistic brush strokes, tropical cyclones, Hurricane Katrina, temporal fading, illustrative visualization}, year = {2009}, }

North Atlantic Hurricane Trend Analysis using Parallel Coordinates and Statistical Techniques

Chad A. Steed, Patrick J. Fitzpatrick, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, and J. Edward Swan II
In Proceedings of the Workshop on Geospatial Visual Analytics, 2008.

Abstract

One of the most challenging tasks in multidimensional multivariate data analysis is to identify and quantify the associations between a set of interrelated variables. In real-world climate studies, this task is even more daunting due to the uncertainty and complexity of dynamic, environmental data sets. Notwithstanding the difficulty, the variability and destructiveness of recent hurricane seasons has invigorated efforts by weather scientists to identify environmental variables that have the greatest impact on the intensity and frequency of seasonal hurricane activity. In general, the goal of such efforts is to improve the accuracy of seasonal forecasts which should, in turn, improve preparedness and reduce the impact of these devastating natural disasters.

Keywords: climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2008:NAH, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Fitzpatrick, Patrick J. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {North Atlantic Hurricane Trend Analysis using Parallel Coordinates and Statistical Techniques}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Workshop on Geospatial Visual Analytics}, abstract = {One of the most challenging tasks in multidimensional multivariate data analysis is to identify and quantify the associations between a set of interrelated variables. In real-world climate studies, this task is even more daunting due to the uncertainty and complexity of dynamic, environmental data sets. Notwithstanding the difficulty, the variability and destructiveness of recent hurricane seasons has invigorated efforts by weather scientists to identify environmental variables that have the greatest impact on the intensity and frequency of seasonal hurricane activity. In general, the goal of such efforts is to improve the accuracy of seasonal forecasts which should, in turn, improve preparedness and reduce the impact of these devastating natural disasters.}, keywords = {climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics}, year = {2008}, }

Practical Applications of Parallel Coordinates to Hurricane Trend Analysis

Chad Steed, Patrick Fitzpatrick, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Amber Yancey, and J. Edward Swan II
In IEEE Visualization 2007 Poster Compendium, 2007.

Abstract

In climate studies, weather scientists are interested in discovering which environmental factors have the greatest influence on significant weather phenomena. Due to the destructiveness of recent hurricane seasons, some scientists are focusing their studies on discovering which environmental variables have the greatest impact on the intensity and frequency of seasonal storm activity using statistical regression techniques. Although complicated, such techniques are effective in screening data and providing quantitative associations. In conjunction with these statistical regression methods, researchers have relied on simple, yet effective, scatter plots or histograms which require several separate plots or layered plots to analyze multiple variables. However, these representation techniques suffer from several perceptual issues because they were not designed for rapid or accurate multidimensional analysis. In this type of study, researchers need visualization techniques that are specifically designed to accommodate the simultaneous display of a high number of variables in order to support exploratory visual analysis. We have applied and extended a highly successful multivariate information visualization technique, parallel coordinates, to the study of hurricane climate data and regression analysis. We analyzed several seasonal hurricane predictors that were provided by Mr. Phil Klotzbach of the Tropical Meteorology Project at Colorado State University. Using an advanced dynamic interaction model, we validated the notion that the parallel coordinates visualization technique enriches the scientists’ ability to rapidly discover and thoroughly analyze complex patterns and trends in climate data.

Keywords: climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2007:PAo, author = {Steed, Chad and Fitzpatrick, Patrick and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Yancey, Amber and Swan II, J. Edward}, title = {Practical Applications of Parallel Coordinates to Hurricane Trend Analysis}, booktitle = {IEEE Visualization 2007 Poster Compendium}, abstract = {In climate studies, weather scientists are interested in discovering which environmental factors have the greatest influence on significant weather phenomena. Due to the destructiveness of recent hurricane seasons, some scientists are focusing their studies on discovering which environmental variables have the greatest impact on the intensity and frequency of seasonal storm activity using statistical regression techniques. Although complicated, such techniques are effective in screening data and providing quantitative associations. In conjunction with these statistical regression methods, researchers have relied on simple, yet effective, scatter plots or histograms which require several separate plots or layered plots to analyze multiple variables. However, these representation techniques suffer from several perceptual issues because they were not designed for rapid or accurate multidimensional analysis. In this type of study, researchers need visualization techniques that are specifically designed to accommodate the simultaneous display of a high number of variables in order to support exploratory visual analysis. We have applied and extended a highly successful multivariate information visualization technique, parallel coordinates, to the study of hurricane climate data and regression analysis. We analyzed several seasonal hurricane predictors that were provided by Mr. Phil Klotzbach of the Tropical Meteorology Project at Colorado State University. Using an advanced dynamic interaction model, we validated the notion that the parallel coordinates visualization technique enriches the scientists' ability to rapidly discover and thoroughly analyze complex patterns and trends in climate data.}, keywords = {climate study, multivariate data, correlation, regression, interaction, statistical analysis, visual analytics}, year = {2007}, }

Effective Display of Conserved Domains on a Multiple Sequence Alignment

Andrew D. Lindeman, Susan M. Bridges, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In IEEE Information Visualization 2007 Poster Compendium, 2007.

Abstract

Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is used to explore the similarity of several related protein sequences by providing a near optimal alignment of the characters in each sequence. Biologists require effective visualization of these alignments as part of their analysis. Although tools such as Jalview have been developed that provide a detailed view of different aspects of the alignments and metadata such as conserved domains, these tools do not automatically download the metadata via the web and the alignment cannot be viewed at varying levels of detail. We have developed a prototype MSA visualization application that focuses on simultaneous display of characteristics of the alignment and automatically downloaded metadata such as conserved domains, and allows the user to view the information at different levels of detail to enable easy recognition of interesting patterns for further analysis.

Keywords: information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Lindeman:2007:EDo, author = {Lindeman, Andrew D. and Bridges, Susan M. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Effective Display of Conserved Domains on a Multiple Sequence Alignment}, booktitle = {IEEE Information Visualization 2007 Poster Compendium}, abstract = {Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is used to explore the similarity of several related protein sequences by providing a near optimal alignment of the characters in each sequence. Biologists require effective visualization of these alignments as part of their analysis. Although tools such as Jalview have been developed that provide a detailed view of different aspects of the alignments and metadata such as conserved domains, these tools do not automatically download the metadata via the web and the alignment cannot be viewed at varying levels of detail. We have developed a prototype MSA visualization application that focuses on simultaneous display of characteristics of the alignment and automatically downloaded metadata such as conserved domains, and allows the user to view the information at different levels of detail to enable easy recognition of interesting patterns for further analysis.}, keywords = {information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains}, year = {2007}, }

Illustrative Rendering for Information Visualization

Chris Waters and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of the IEEE Visualization/IEEE Information Visualization Conference Compendium, 2006.

Abstract

In this work, we study the applicability of some illustrative rendering techniques to information visualization. Specifically, we study the effect of haloing and aerial perspective. Applications from graph visualization, security visualization, and multivariate visualizations are tested.

Keywords: information visualization, illustrative rendering, non-photorealistic rendering, graph visualization, parallel coordinates

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Waters:2006:IRf, author = {Waters, Chris and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Illustrative Rendering for Information Visualization}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE Visualization/IEEE Information Visualization Conference Compendium}, abstract = {In this work, we study the applicability of some illustrative rendering techniques to information visualization. Specifically, we study the effect of haloing and aerial perspective. Applications from graph visualization, security visualization, and multivariate visualizations are tested.}, keywords = {information visualization, illustrative rendering, non-photorealistic rendering, graph visualization, parallel coordinates}, year = {2006}, }

CluVis: A Framework for Cluster Computer Metadata Visualization

Ben Craig, Joseph Langley, Chris Waters, and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization Poster Compendium, 2005.

Abstract

In this work, we describe and implement a framework for visualizing cluster computer metrics and metadata. Interaction methods for creating and modifying composite data charts are specified in conjunction with a dual MoireGraph interface.

Keywords: information visualization, cluster visualization

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Craig:2005:CVA, author = {Craig, Ben and Langley, Joseph and Waters, Chris and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {CluVis: A Framework for Cluster Computer Metadata Visualization}, booktitle = {IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization Poster Compendium}, abstract = {In this work, we describe and implement a framework for visualizing cluster computer metrics and metadata. Interaction methods for creating and modifying composite data charts are specified in conjunction with a dual MoireGraph interface.}, keywords = {information visualization, cluster visualization}, year = {2005}, }

Exploring Defects in Nematic Liquid Crystals

Ketan Mehta and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Posters Compendium: IEEE Visualization 2005 and the IEEE Information Visualization Symposium, 2005.

Abstract

Visualization of temporal and spatial tensor data is a challenging task due to the large amount of multi-dimensional data. In most of the visualization, scientists are interested in finding certain defects, anomalies, or correlations while exploring data. Hence, visualization requires efficient exploration and representation techniques. In order to use the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as a biosensor, scientists need to study and explore simulations for understanding the relationship between topological defects and the biological specimen. To solve the above problem, we merge scientific and information visualization techniques to create a controlled exploration environment. System enables a user to filter and explore NLC data sets for orientation defects. We introduce a three level visualization approach for exploring tensor data sets using timeline, parallel coordinate, and glyph based visualization. Visualization helps in reducing unnecessary data at each stage and focus on the relevant ones. This abstract discusses the goal, approach and various research issues found in the design of the NLC data visualization system.

Keywords: tensor visualization, nematic liquid crystals, defects

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Mehta:2005:EDi, author = {Mehta, Ketan and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Exploring Defects in Nematic Liquid Crystals}, booktitle = {Posters Compendium: IEEE Visualization 2005 and the IEEE Information Visualization Symposium}, abstract = {Visualization of temporal and spatial tensor data is a challenging task due to the large amount of multi-dimensional data. In most of the visualization, scientists are interested in finding certain defects, anomalies, or correlations while exploring data. Hence, visualization requires efficient exploration and representation techniques. In order to use the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as a biosensor, scientists need to study and explore simulations for understanding the relationship between topological defects and the biological specimen. To solve the above problem, we merge scientific and information visualization techniques to create a controlled exploration environment. System enables a user to filter and explore NLC data sets for orientation defects. We introduce a three level visualization approach for exploring tensor data sets using timeline, parallel coordinate, and glyph based visualization. Visualization helps in reducing unnecessary data at each stage and focus on the relevant ones. This abstract discusses the goal, approach and various research issues found in the design of the NLC data visualization system.}, keywords = {tensor visualization, nematic liquid crystals, defects}, year = {2005}, }

Interactive Poster: Visualizing and Interacting with Multi-Tree Hierarchical Data

Mahnas Jean Mohammadi-Aragh and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In Posters Compendium: IEEE Visualization 2004 and the IEEE Information Visualization Symposium, 2004.

Abstract

This work focuses on visualizing highly cyclic hierarchical data. A user interface is discussed and its interaction is illustrated using a recipe database example. This example showcases a database with multiple categories for each recipe (database entry).

Keywords: information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, database visualization

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Mohammadi-Aragh:2004:VaI, author = {Mohammadi-Aragh, Mahnas Jean and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Interactive Poster: Visualizing and Interacting with Multi-Tree Hierarchical Data}, booktitle = {Posters Compendium: IEEE Visualization 2004 and the IEEE Information Visualization Symposium}, abstract = {This work focuses on visualizing highly cyclic hierarchical data. A user interface is discussed and its interaction is illustrated using a recipe database example. This example showcases a database with multiple categories for each recipe (database entry).}, keywords = {information visualization, focus+context, radial graph layout, database visualization}, year = {2004}, }

VisSheet Redux: Redesigning a Visualization Exploration Spreadsheet for the Web

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
In SIGGRAPH 2002 Conference Abstracts and Applications, 2002.

Abstract

The exploration of complex data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. In recent work, we produced a visualization exploration spreadsheet to address this issue. The developed application, however, was implemented for off-line use only. For data sets on remote sites, this approach is not appropriate. Thus, a web-based version of the visualization exploration spreadsheet is needed. This abstract discusses the process of transforming the interface from an off-line to an on-line design.

Keywords: scientific visualization, world-wide web, visualization interfaces

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2002:VSR, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {VisSheet Redux: Redesigning a Visualization Exploration Spreadsheet for the Web}, booktitle = {SIGGRAPH 2002 Conference Abstracts and Applications}, abstract = {The exploration of complex data sets requires interfaces to present and navigate through the visualization of the data. In recent work, we produced a visualization exploration spreadsheet to address this issue. The developed application, however, was implemented for off-line use only. For data sets on remote sites, this approach is not appropriate. Thus, a web-based version of the visualization exploration spreadsheet is needed. This abstract discusses the process of transforming the interface from an off-line to an on-line design.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, world-wide web, visualization interfaces}, year = {2002}, }

Simulation of prostate cryoablation

Jerzy Jankun, Monika Jankun, T. J. Kelly, and Steven H. Selman
In Proceedings 10th World Congress of Cryosurgery, 1998.

Abstract

Cryoablation therapy is a method of minimally invasive cancer treatment through use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and consequently to destroy tumors. Liquid nitrogen cools the tumor by a set of probes (call “cryoprobes”) with adjustable flow rates, cooling temperature and activation time. Though cryoablation has been used for some time, the behavior of the cryoprobe system has not been extensively studied. For example, in prostate cancer treatment, the settings of the cryoprobe to achieve a frozen area of appropriate size and shape were developed empirically. The Cryoablation Simulator (or “CryoSim”) is an attempt to provide a modeling, training, and automation platform for cryoablation therapy. Provided with the physical characteristics of the surrounding tissue, three-dimensional ultrasound of the affected region, and the positions and settings of the cryoprobes, CryoSim. calculates the isotherm of the “killing” region of frozen temperatures. This isotherm is depicted visually with reference to the surrounding tissue. Within the simulator, the user may move the probes, change cryoprobe settings and adjust their viewpoint. The simulator uses a discrete differential equation solver to calculate the temperature at user-adjustable grid-points in simulated space. CryoSim was developed using C++ and the Direct3D graphical libraries for Windows 95 and Windows NT. Initial simulations show reasonable conformity to known results. Future work includes further verification tests and integration into a mechanically driven system using CryoSim optimized placements.

Keywords: cryosurgery, prostate cancer, three-dimensional ultrasound, computer modeling

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun:1998:SoP, author = {Jankun, Jerzy and Jankun, Monika and Kelly, T. J. and Selman, Steven H.}, title = {Simulation of prostate cryoablation}, booktitle = {Proceedings 10th World Congress of Cryosurgery}, abstract = {Cryoablation therapy is a method of minimally invasive cancer treatment through use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and consequently to destroy tumors. Liquid nitrogen cools the tumor by a set of probes (call ``cryoprobes'') with adjustable flow rates, cooling temperature and activation time. Though cryoablation has been used for some time, the behavior of the cryoprobe system has not been extensively studied. For example, in prostate cancer treatment, the settings of the cryoprobe to achieve a frozen area of appropriate size and shape were developed empirically. The Cryoablation Simulator (or ``CryoSim'') is an attempt to provide a modeling, training, and automation platform for cryoablation therapy. Provided with the physical characteristics of the surrounding tissue, three-dimensional ultrasound of the affected region, and the positions and settings of the cryoprobes, CryoSim. calculates the isotherm of the ``killing'' region of frozen temperatures. This isotherm is depicted visually with reference to the surrounding tissue. Within the simulator, the user may move the probes, change cryoprobe settings and adjust their viewpoint. The simulator uses a discrete differential equation solver to calculate the temperature at user-adjustable grid-points in simulated space. CryoSim was developed using C++ and the Direct3D graphical libraries for Windows 95 and Windows NT. Initial simulations show reasonable conformity to known results. Future work includes further verification tests and integration into a mechanically driven system using CryoSim optimized placements.}, keywords = {cryosurgery, prostate cancer, three-dimensional ultrasound, computer modeling}, year = {1998}, }

Workshops or position paper

A Visual and Statistical Benchmark for Graph Sampling Methods

Fangyan Zhang, Song Zhang, Pak Chung Wong, J. Edward Swan II, and T.J. Jankun-Kelly
In Proceedings of the Exploring Graphs at Scale Workshop 2015, 2015.

Abstract

Keywords:

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PDF [1.88 MB]

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Zhang:2015:AVa, author = {Zhang, Fangyan and Zhang, Song and Wong, Pak Chung and Swan II, J.\ Edward and Jankun-Kelly, T.J.}, title = {A Visual and Statistical Benchmark for Graph Sampling Methods}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Exploring Graphs at Scale Workshop 2015}, abstract = {}, keywords = {}, year = {2015}, }

Visualizations for Exploration of American Football Season and Play Data

Sean G. Owens and T. J. Jankun-Kelly
In 1st IEEE Workshop on Sport Data Visualization, 2013.

Abstract

Sports visualization is an emerging area of research. As the sports’ industries are quickly rising into the billions of dollars in value, the need for performance evaluation is great. While, many sports such as baseball and soccer have developed fairly extensive visualization platforms for viewing player and team performance, one sport that has been lacking in meaningful visualizations is American football. The sport poses a challenge because its field only has one meaningful axis, therefore, spatial mapping of data onto a 2-dimensional field is both invalid and misleading. This paper presents two different visualizations for use in the analysis of American collegiate football data. The first provides an analysis of season-long data on a parallel coordinates chart, and the second presents a novel method of mapping football’s 1-dimensional system using an arc diagram.

Keywords: visualization, American collegiate football, sports visualization, arc diagram, spatial mapping

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PDF [644 kB]

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Owens:2013:VfE, author = {Owens, Sean G. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Visualizations for Exploration of American Football Season and Play Data}, booktitle = {1st IEEE Workshop on Sport Data Visualization}, abstract = {Sports visualization is an emerging area of research. As the sports' industries are quickly rising into the billions of dollars in value, the need for performance evaluation is great. While, many sports such as baseball and soccer have developed fairly extensive visualization platforms for viewing player and team performance, one sport that has been lacking in meaningful visualizations is American football. The sport poses a challenge because its field only has one meaningful axis, therefore, spatial mapping of data onto a 2-dimensional field is both invalid and misleading. This paper presents two different visualizations for use in the analysis of American collegiate football data. The first provides an analysis of season-long data on a parallel coordinates chart, and the second presents a novel method of mapping football's 1-dimensional system using an arc diagram.}, keywords = {visualization, American collegiate football, sports visualization, arc diagram, spatial mapping}, year = {2013}, }

The Case for Visual Analysis Provenance Cases

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.
In Workshop on Analytic Provenance: Process + Interaction + Insight; CHI 2011 Workshop, 2011.

Abstract

While visual analytics holds potential for assisting users to make timely sense of vast quantities of complex data, research into providing such tools is stymied by the lack of real-world records of the process used by analysts. Visualization researchers are able to develop tools and gather usage and insight data from their collaborators, but analytical provenance “in the large” is missing. In this position paper, I briefly outline the benefits and need for a collection of the visual analysis process, and end with a call to action.

Keywords: visual exploration, visual analytics, provenance

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PDF [119 kB]

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2011:TCf, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {The Case for Visual Analysis Provenance Cases}, booktitle = {Workshop on Analytic Provenance: Process + Interaction + Insight; CHI 2011 Workshop}, abstract = {While visual analytics holds potential for assisting users to make timely sense of vast quantities of complex data, research into providing such tools is stymied by the lack of real-world records of the process used by analysts. Visualization researchers are able to develop tools and gather usage and insight data from their collaborators, but analytical provenance ``in the large'' is missing. In this position paper, I briefly outline the benefits and need for a collection of the visual analysis process, and end with a call to action.}, keywords = {visual exploration, visual analytics, provenance}, year = {2011}, }

GOModeler—A tool for hypothesis driven interrogation of functional genomics datasets

Prashanti Manda, McKinley Freeman, Susan M. Bridges, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Fiona McCarthy, Shane Burgess, and Qiqi Lu
In Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society, 2010.

Abstract

Functional genomics technologies that measure genome expression at a global scale are accelerating biological knowledge discovery. Generating these high throughput datasets is relatively easy compared to the downstream functional modeling necessary for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern the biology under investigation. A number of publicly available ’discovery-based’ computational tools use the computationally amenable Gene Ontology (GO) for hypothesis generation. However, there are few tools that support hypothesis-based testing using the GO and none that support testing with user defined hypothesis terms.Here, we present GOModeler, a tool that enables researchers to conduct hypothesis-based testing of high throughput datasets using the GO. GOModeler summarizes the overall effect of a user defined gene/protein differential expression dataset on specific GO hypothesis terms selected by the user to describe a biological experiment. The design of the tool allows the user to complement the functional information in the GO with his/her domain specific expertise for comprehensive hypothesis testing.

Keywords: bioinformatics, GO, genomics, visualization

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Manda:2010:GOM, author = {Manda, Prashanti and Freeman, McKinley and Bridges, Susan M. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and McCarthy, Fiona and Burgess, Shane and Lu, Qiqi}, title = {GOModeler---A tool for hypothesis driven interrogation of functional genomics datasets}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society}, abstract = {Functional genomics technologies that measure genome expression at a global scale are accelerating biological knowledge discovery. Generating these high throughput datasets is relatively easy compared to the downstream functional modeling necessary for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern the biology under investigation. A number of publicly available 'discovery-based' computational tools use the computationally amenable Gene Ontology (GO) for hypothesis generation. However, there are few tools that support hypothesis-based testing using the GO and none that support testing with user defined hypothesis terms.Here, we present GOModeler, a tool that enables researchers to conduct hypothesis-based testing of high throughput datasets using the GO. GOModeler summarizes the overall effect of a user defined gene/protein differential expression dataset on specific GO hypothesis terms selected by the user to describe a biological experiment. The design of the tool allows the user to complement the functional information in the GO with his/her domain specific expertise for comprehensive hypothesis testing.}, keywords = {bioinformatics, GO, genomics, visualization}, year = {2010}, }

Illustrative Visualization Techniques for Hurricane Advisory Information

Chad A. Steed, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, J. Edward Swan II, and Robert J. Moorhead
In Proceedings of the Oceans ’09 MTS/IEEE Biloxi Technical Program, 2009.

Abstract

We have developed new illustrative visualization techniques inspired by artistic brush strokes for graphically representing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) hurricane advisory statements. To address the complexity of the advisory information and the limitations of traditional map displays, our techniques offer enhanced representations that map advisory data attributes to the visual features in brush strokes. By condensing the information into a single, comprehensible image, our new representations avoid many perceptual issues that affect the perception and cognition of the current NHC graphical products. In the current work, we describe the motivation and algorithmic details of two variants of our approach: the small brush stroke and long brush stroke methods. We also present the results of applying our techniques to the representation of hurricane advisories from the 2005 season, which include those of the infamous Hurricane Katrina. The results highlight the promise of our illustrative visualization methods as an effective approach for the dispensation of this vital information.

Keywords: artistic brush strokes, tropical cyclones, Hurricane Katrina, temporal fading, illustrative visualization

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PDF [2.05 MB]

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Steed:2009:IVT, author = {Steed, Chad A. and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Swan II, J. Edward and Moorhead, Robert J.}, title = {Illustrative Visualization Techniques for Hurricane Advisory Information}, booktitle = {Proceedings of the Oceans '09 MTS/IEEE Biloxi Technical Program}, abstract = {We have developed new illustrative visualization techniques inspired by artistic brush strokes for graphically representing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Hurricane Center's (NHC) hurricane advisory statements. To address the complexity of the advisory information and the limitations of traditional map displays, our techniques offer enhanced representations that map advisory data attributes to the visual features in brush strokes. By condensing the information into a single, comprehensible image, our new representations avoid many perceptual issues that affect the perception and cognition of the current NHC graphical products. In the current work, we describe the motivation and algorithmic details of two variants of our approach: the small brush stroke and long brush stroke methods. We also present the results of applying our techniques to the representation of hurricane advisories from the 2005 season, which include those of the infamous Hurricane Katrina. The results highlight the promise of our illustrative visualization methods as an effective approach for the dispensation of this vital information. }, keywords = {artistic brush strokes, tropical cyclones, Hurricane Katrina, temporal fading, illustrative visualization}, year = {2009}, }

Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Andrew D. Lindeman, and Susan M. Bridges
In Posters of the Sixth Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society, 2009.

Abstract

Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.

Keywords: information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2009:EVAa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Lindeman, Andrew D. and Bridges, Susan M.}, title = {Exploratory Visual Analysis of Conserved Domains on Multiple Sequence Alignments}, booktitle = {Posters of the Sixth Annual Conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society}, abstract = {Multiple alignment of protein sequences can provide insight into sequence conservation across many species and thus allow identification of those sections of the sequence most critical to protein function. This insight can be augmented by joint display of conserved domains along the sequences. By fusing this metadata visually, biologists can analyze sequence conservation and functional motifs simultaneously and efficiently.}, keywords = {information visualization, bioinformatics, multiple sequence alignment, conserved domains}, year = {2009}, }

Information Wants to Be Seen: Getting Everyone Talking Visualization

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.
In Visualization on the Web Workshop, 2009.

Abstract

At Mississippi State, I have been blogging and using other social media to talk about visualization, computer graphics, and gaming for five years. Though the blogging has been in bursts, I have been using other outlets such as Twitter and Facebook more recently. However, my efforts have been more focused in the last few years in getting my students talking about visualization and their research on the web. I’ve met with some success and some failures which I discuss here.

Keywords: visualization, social networking, blogging

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BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Jankun-Kelly:2009:IWt, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Information Wants to Be Seen: Getting Everyone Talking Visualization}, booktitle = {Visualization on the Web Workshop}, abstract = {At Mississippi State, I have been blogging and using other social media to talk about visualization, computer graphics, and gaming for five years. Though the blogging has been in bursts, I have been using other outlets such as Twitter and Facebook more recently. However, my efforts have been more focused in the last few years in getting my students talking about visualization and their research on the web. I've met with some success and some failures which I discuss here.}, keywords = {visualization, social networking, blogging}, year = {2009}, }

VisPortal: Deploying Grid-Enabled Visualization Tools through a Web-Portal Interface

E. Wes Bethel, Cristina Siegerist, John Shalf, Praveenkumar Shetty, T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Oliver Kreylos, and Kwan-Liu Ma
In Third Annual Workshop on Advanced Collaborative Environments, 2003.

Abstract

The LBNL/NERSC VisPortal effort explores ways to deliver advanced Remote/Distributed Visualization (RDV) capabilities through a Grid-enabled web-portal interface. The effort focus on latency tolerant distributed visualization algorithms, GUI designs that are more appropriate for the capabilities of web interfaces, and refactoring parallel-distributed applications to work in a N-tiered component deployment strategy. Most importantly, our aim is to leverage commercially-supported technology as much as possible in order to create a deployable, supportable, and hence viable platform for delivering grid-based visualization services to collaboratory users.

Keywords: scientific visualization, grid-based computing, world-wide web, visualization interfaces

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PDF [405 kB]

BibTeX Citation

@inproceedings{Bethel:2003:VPD, author = {Bethel, E. Wes and Siegerist, Cristina and Shalf, John and Shetty, Praveenkumar and Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Kreylos, Oliver and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {VisPortal: Deploying Grid-Enabled Visualization Tools through a Web-Portal Interface}, booktitle = {Third Annual Workshop on Advanced Collaborative Environments}, abstract = {The LBNL/NERSC VisPortal effort explores ways to deliver advanced Remote/Distributed Visualization (RDV) capabilities through a Grid-enabled web-portal interface. The effort focus on latency tolerant distributed visualization algorithms, GUI designs that are more appropriate for the capabilities of web interfaces, and refactoring parallel-distributed applications to work in a N-tiered component deployment strategy. Most importantly, our aim is to leverage commercially-supported technology as much as possible in order to create a deployable, supportable, and hence viable platform for delivering grid-based visualization services to collaboratory users.}, keywords = {scientific visualization, grid-based computing, world-wide web, visualization interfaces}, year = {2003}, }

Technical Reports

Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.
Technical Report MSU-060315-2, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mississippi State University, 2006.

Abstract

Visualization exploration is an iterative process of setting parameters, rendering, and evaluating results. This process can be recorded and analyzed in order to make visualization exploration more efficient and more effective. This work describes methods for visualizing the visualization process using new visualization process graphs; several visualization process relations are introduced to construct these graphs. These graphs and relations were used to analyze and improve a network routing visualization, and the results of this analysis are presented. Through this analysis, redundant exploration was quickly identified and eliminated.

Keywords: visualization process, visualization analysis, visualization systems, information visualization

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PDF [3.34 MB]

BibTeX Citation

@techreport{Jankun-Kelly:2006:UVP, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Using Visualization Process Graphs to Improve Visualization Exploration}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is an iterative process of setting parameters, rendering, and evaluating results. This process can be recorded and analyzed in order to make visualization exploration more efficient and more effective. This work describes methods for visualizing the visualization process using new visualization process graphs; several visualization process relations are introduced to construct these graphs. These graphs and relations were used to analyze and improve a network routing visualization, and the results of this analysis are presented. Through this analysis, redundant exploration was quickly identified and eliminated.}, keywords = {visualization process, visualization analysis, visualization systems, information visualization}, institution = {Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mississippi State University}, number = {MSU-060315-2}, year = {2006}, }

A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration

T. J. Jankun-Kelly, Kwan-Liu Ma, and Michael Gertz
Technical Report MSU-060315-1, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mississippi State University, 2006.

Abstract

Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations—the depiction—and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.

Keywords: visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization

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PDF [4.05 MB]

BibTeX Citation

@techreport{Jankun-Kelly:2006:AMa, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu and Gertz, Michael}, title = {A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations---the depiction---and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without formal models of the process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized to assist users and system designers. Towards this end, we introduce the P-Set Model of Visualization Exploration for describing this process and a framework to encapsulate, share, and analyze visual explorations. In addition, systems utilizing the model and framework are more efficient as redundant exploration is avoided. Several examples drawn from visualization applications demonstrate these benefits. Taken together, the model and framework provide an effective means to exploit the information within the visual exploration process.}, keywords = {visualization exploration process, visualization, visualization systems, history, derivation, collaboration, XML, software framework, science of visualization}, institution = {Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mississippi State University}, number = {MSU-060315-1}, year = {2006}, }

Focus+Context Display of the Visualization Exploration Process

T. J. Jankun-Kelly and Kwan-Liu Ma
Technical Report CSE-2002-13, Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, 2002.

Abstract

The purpose of the visualization process is to extract insight from information via visual representations. However, the visualization process itself is information and can be in turned visualized. This work describes a method for visualizing the visualization process using a new focus+context radial graph algorithm. Four different metrics for extracting information from the visualization are examined. Using an example from a network visualization system, the effectiveness of the visualization and metrics are demonstrated. Using the methods discussed here, a better understanding of a particular visualization process—and its corresponding results—is facilitated.

Keywords: information visualization, focus+context, visualization process, visualization models, graph drawing

BibTeX Citation

@techreport{Jankun-Kelly:2002:FCD, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J. and Ma, Kwan-Liu}, title = {Focus+Context Display of the Visualization Exploration Process}, abstract = {The purpose of the visualization process is to extract insight from information via visual representations. However, the visualization process itself is information and can be in turned visualized. This work describes a method for visualizing the visualization process using a new focus+context radial graph algorithm. Four different metrics for extracting information from the visualization are examined. Using an example from a network visualization system, the effectiveness of the visualization and metrics are demonstrated. Using the methods discussed here, a better understanding of a particular visualization process---and its corresponding results---is facilitated. }, keywords = {information visualization, focus+context, visualization process, visualization models, graph drawing}, institution = {Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis}, number = {CSE-2002-13}, year = {2002}, }

Dissertation

Visualizing Visualization: A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration

Jankun-Kelly, T. J.
University of California, Davis, Jun 2003.

Abstract

Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations—the depiction—and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without user interfaces for and formal models of the visualization process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized. Towards this end, this dissertation introduces a model and framework for the visualization exploration process. This research aims at providing a framework for capturing, representing, and manipulating information derived during the visualization discovery processes in a systematic manner. In particular, this work focuses on the exploration during the data analysis and visualization process through the use of intuitive graphical user interfaces. These interfaces provide a structured environment for the exploration of the visualization parameter space. The interfaces utilize a formal model of the visualization process that captures the fundamental operations performed during this exploration. The model is independent of the visualization performed or user interface utilized. In addition, instances of the model can be shared between users via an interoperable representation format. The goal of this work is to maximize user productivity by offering them an effective mechanism to fetch, edit, reuse, and share with others their visualizations which may include raw data, data associations, visualization results, and the steps taken to derive the visualization results.

Keywords: scientific visualization, information visualization, user interfaces, conceptual modeling

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PDF [3.25 MB]

BibTeX Citation

@phdthesis{Jankun-Kelly:2003:dissertation, author = {Jankun-Kelly, T. J.}, title = {Visualizing Visualization: A Model and Framework for Visualization Exploration}, abstract = {Visualization exploration is the process of extracting insight from data via interaction with visual depictions of that data. Visualization exploration is more than presentation; the interaction with both the data and its depiction is as important as the data and depiction itself. Previous visualization research has focused on the generation of visualizations---the depiction---and not on the exploratory aspects of the visualization process. However, without user interfaces for and formal models of the visualization process, visualization exploration sessions cannot be fully utilized. Towards this end, this dissertation introduces a model and framework for the visualization exploration process. This research aims at providing a framework for capturing, representing, and manipulating information derived during the visualization discovery processes in a systematic manner. In particular, this work focuses on the exploration during the data analysis and visualization process through the use of intuitive graphical user interfaces. These interfaces provide a structured environment for the exploration of the visualization parameter space. The interfaces utilize a formal model of the visualization process that captures the fundamental operations performed during this exploration. The model is independent of the visualization performed or user interface utilized. In addition, instances of the model can be shared between users via an interoperable representation format. The goal of this work is to maximize user productivity by offering them an effective mechanism to fetch, edit, reuse, and share with others their visualizations which may include raw data, data associations, visualization results, and the steps taken to derive the visualization results. }, keywords = {scientific visualization, information visualization, user interfaces, conceptual modeling}, adviser = {}, school = {University of California, Davis}, month = {Jun}, year = {2003}, }